How to Make Raw Liquid Whey (Recipe and Video How-to)

by Sarah Fermented Foods, Raw Milk at Home, VideosComments: 281

wheyDo you know how to make whey from yogurt, kefir or raw milk? A by-product of this simple technique is nutrient rich cream cheese that is loaded with enzymes and probiotics.

The recipe below describes how with visual instructions via video demonstration!

How to Make Whey the REAL Way

Making real, liquid, nutrient rich, unadulterated whey in your own kitchen is a MUST step for any traditional cook to learn.

Without whey in its whole, liquid form, many other traditional recipes cannot even be attempted.  You cannot buy whey from the store except in a denatured, unhealthy, powdered whey form. It is worth your time to learn what I show you in the video below.

Other video lessons on this blog show you how to use this whole food form of whey to make many delicious, healthful recipes for your family.  Whey as made in the video demo below will keep up to 6 months in the refrigerator in a sealed mason jar.

If you absolutely have no access to farm fresh milk to make whole, unadulterated, enzyme rich whey, then you can use plain, organic yogurt from the store instead. The process is basically exactly the same thing as shown in the video.

You won’t get nearly as much whey using yogurt as clabbered, farm fresh milk, but at least you can get enough to get you started.

Wonderful Whey and REAL Cream Cheese

The raw, enzyme rich strawberry cream cheese I make in the video is fantastic on a sourdough or sprouted bagel for breakfast. This brand has an excellent seven grain sprouted English muffin to try. Don’t buy the Ezekiel sprouted muffins as they contain soy.

To make, just take your cream cheese left over from making liquid whey and add a few strawberries and a dash of dark maple syrup to taste. Mix together by pulsing a few times in your food processor. This wonderful, fresh, REAL strawberry cream cheese will last one to two weeks in the refrigerator.  Another wonderful use for this healthy raw cheese is to make an easy no bake cheesecake.

You will turn up your nose to the fake, Philadelphia strawberry cream cheese after trying this truly healthy, probiotic rich, homemade version.

No access to raw milk where you live? No problem. Check out this recipe plus video on how to separate whey from yogurt purchased from the store.

Cloudy Whey vs Clear Whey

No matter whether your whey turns out cloudy or clear, it is safe and fine to use in all your favorite recipes. This article explains why sometimes whey is cloudy compared to its usual golden color.

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Raw Whey Recipe

How to separate raw, liquid whey from clabbered milk. The process also creates probiotic rich cream cheese.

Prep Time 5 minutes
Author Sarah

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Allow the raw milk to sit on the counter for 1-3 days at room temperature. 

  2. When the milk separates into curds and whey (transforms into clabbered milk) you are ready to proceed. Note that the fresher the raw milk and the colder the temperature of your house, the longer it will take the raw milk to clabber.

  3. Line a clean, large glass bowl with a clean, white dishtowel that isn't too thick. Cheesecloth will also work, but the holes in the mesh must be very small, else the milk curds will pass through.

  4. Gently pour the clabbered milk into the middle of the dish towel. Gather up the ends and fasten with a rubber band. Attach to a knob on an upper cabinet in your kitchen as shown in the picture.

  5. Let the raw whey drip into the bowl underneath. This process will continue for an hour or two.

  6. After the dripping stops, gently take down the hanging bag and place it into a clean bowl. Scrape out the raw cream cheese that is inside the bag, put in a container with a lid and refrigerate.

  7. Pour the liquid whey from the dripping bowl into a glass mason jar, afix the lid and refrigerate. 

  8. Refrigerated, raw cream cheese will be good to eat for about a week. Raw whey will last several months refrigerated.

Making Whey and Cream Cheese (Video How-to)

How to Use Whey in Recipes

How to Make Ricotta Three Ways (plus Video How-to)

Gjetost Cheese Recipe

Yogurt Cheese

Perfect Probiotic Cottage Cheese

Cheese Making:  Common Problems and Solutions

 

Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

The Healthy Home Economist holds a Master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Mother to 3 healthy children, blogger, and best-selling author, she writes about the practical application of Traditional Diet and evidence-based wellness within the modern household. Her work has been featured by USA Today, The New York Times, ABC, NBC, and many others.

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