How to Roast a Duck and Make Duck Broth (recipe + VIDEO)

by Sarah Affiliate linksBone broth, Stock, and Soups, Broth, Stock, and Soups, Recipes, VideosComments: 57

duck broth
We roasted two ducks for Christmas dinner this year, and after we picked them clean, I made a ton of homemade bone broth too. As luck would have it, I was able to source them for the fantastic price. For such a gourmet dinner choice plus the duck broth, they turned out less expensive than the local chickens I buy! 

Duck is a much fattier bird than turkey or chicken. One great benefit of roasting a fatty bird like duck or goose is that you can cook it at a higher temperature, so the meal is ready faster, yet there is little risk of dried out meat.

We baste our duck while it is cooking. This glazes the meat beautifully and results in the most out of this world crispy duck skin you’ve ever tasted.

There is much less meat to be had on a duck versus a turkey, but you get a ton of duck fat in return. I save this wonderfully healthy, nutritious, tasty fat in a glass container in the fridge and use it for weeks later to season roast vegetables. My children never turn down vegetables roasted in duck fat. They are simply too delicious to resist (even more tasty than veggies cooked in butter if that is possible)!

How to Make Roast Duck and Duck Broth (Video Tutorial)

Duck also happens to make the most delectable bone broth!  In this video, I discuss tips for roasting a duck and making duck broth or duck stock in your own kitchen. Following the video, you will find my recipe for making duck broth as well. Enjoy!

duck broth
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Homemade Duck Broth Recipe

Recipe for homemade duck broth made from roasted duck that serves as a rich and nourishing base for soups, sauces, and gravy.

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours 50 minutes
Total Time 4 hours
Servings 8 quarts
Author Sarah

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Place duck carcasses in a large stockpot. Break up the bones into pieces if necessary to fit the pot.

  2. Add cold filtered water - enough to cover.

  3. Add a small amount of store bought or homemade apple cider vinegar. 1/4 cup works well. Stir.

  4. Leave on the counter for 30 minutes per French culinary practice.

  5. Place stockpot on the heat and bring to a boil. Skim off and discard any foam (off flavors and impurities) that rise to the top just before boiling is reached. 

  6. Add optional cooked giblets with juices and chopped veggies, and then turn heat down to low, cover, and let simmer for 6-24 hours.

  7. Remove from heat, cool and strain into large 1/2 gallon mason jars or containers of choice.

  8. Duck broth will stay good for up to 5 days refrigerated. Freeze what you will not use during that time.

Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

More Information on Duck and Bone Broth

Benefits of Duck Eggs: More Nutritious and Less Allergenic

Homemade Turkey Broth

Chicken Stock

Homemade Shrimp Stock

5 Reasons Why Your Stock Won’t Gel

Best Bone Broth

Stock versus Bone Broth

Perfect Simmer on Your Bone Broth

The Healthy Home Economist holds a Master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Mother to 3 healthy children, blogger, and best-selling author, she writes about the practical application of Traditional Diet and evidence-based wellness within the modern household. Her work has been featured by USA Today, The New York Times, ABC, NBC, and many others.

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