Stock or Broth – Are You Confused?

by Sarah Recipes, Stocks and SoupsComments: 92

stock or broth

By Kim Schuette, CN, Certified GAPS Practitioner, founder BioDynamic Wellness and GAPSInfo.com

French chefs have a term fonds de cuisine, which translates to “the foundation and working capital of the kitchen.”

Bone and meat stock provide just that, the foundation of both the kitchen and ultimately one’s physical health. One of the most common questions that those individuals embarking upon the GAPS Diet have is “Do I make stock or broth?” What is the difference between the two?

The two words are often used interchangeably by the most educated of chefs. However, for purposes of the GAPS Diet, a temporary diet to heal/seal the gut wall and resolve autoimmune issues, Natasha Campbell-McBride MD uses the terms “meat stock” and “bone stock.” In this article, I will use “stock” when referencing meat stock and “broth” for bone stock.

Stock or Broth: Start with Meat Stock When Healing The Gut

Stock is used in the beginning stages of the GAPS Diet, especially during the Introduction Diet where the primary focus is in healing the gut. Broth is ideal for consuming once gut healing has taken place. The significant difference is that the stock (meat stock) is not cooked as long as broth (bone stock).

Stock is especially rich in gelatin and free amino acids, like proline and glycine. These amino acids along with the gelatinous protein from the meat and connective tissue are particularly beneficial in healing and strengthening connective tissue. These nutrients are pulled out of the meat and connective tissue during the first several hours of cooking meaty fish, poultry, beef and lamb. The larger the bones, the longer the cooking time.

In Gut and Psychology Syndrome, Dr. Campbell-McBride explains how to prepare stock (meat stock) to be used during the early stages of the GAPS Diet. Her recipe can also be found at the end of this article.

Stock prepared in this way supports good digestion, as well as promotes proper secretion of hydrochloric acid, which is needed for breaking down proteins in the stomach. Lack of adequate hydrochloric acid can lead to a myriad of symptoms including acid reflux, skin disorders, anemia, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, vitiligo, asthma, food allergies and more. Gelatin, a major component of meat stock, also assists in the proper digestion of proteins ensuring optimal growth in infants and children. Gelatin improves the integrity of collagen, which is reflected in the improved appearance of the skin as well as in the lessening of digestive tract inflammation.

Additionally, gelatin enhances the digestibility of grains and legumes cooked in it. Both grains and legumes are eliminated in the beginning of the GAPS Diet, with grains avoided completely until one is ready to transition off the GAPS Diet. Once gut healing is complete and the digestive tract function is restored, properly prepared grains and legumes will be best enjoyed prepared using meat stock or bone broth.

Stock or Broth: When to Introduce

Bone stock or broth is introduced after the Introduction Diet as gut healing has advanced. Some with longstanding gut issues find that if they introduce broth (bone stock) early prior to the sealing of the gut, they have reactions to the free glutamates that result from the longer cooked gelatin.  Those who are sensitive to MSG will generally be sensitive to these free glutamates until their guts are healed.

The timing on when a GAPS person is ready to progress from meat stock to bone broth is individual. Those children who are autistic or ADD/ADHD and who are suffering from seizures or tics are among the people who should avoid free glutamates until their guts are healed. Free glutamates include not only MSG but glutamine and glutamic acid. These are excitoxins and can have a damaging effect on neurons. This is why I do not recommend using nutritional formulas containing glutamine in cases of the above mentioned conditions as well as Crohn’s or Leaky Gut Syndrome. Excitotoxins encourage inflammation in the gut and brain, the exact situation we are trying to heal.

Uncomfortable die-off reactions, as well as symptoms of nervous system agitation, are signs that your digestive tract is best served staying with the meat stock. Die off reactions can include diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, constipation and skin eruptions or rashes. Making the transition gradually from stock (meat stock) to broth (bone stock) is advisable. Cooking broth at a very low temperature (slow simmer) will minimize the formation of free glutamates.

Excellent broth (bone stock) recipes can be found in Sally Fallon Morell’s Nourishing Traditions Cookbook. This timeless cookbook should be in every kitchen. Broth is an invaluable addition to the diet of young children and all who desire optimal health. Broth is rich in all the minerals necessary to build strong teeth and bones. Broth serves as an excellent replacement for milk in the diet of those who are lactose intolerant.

However, in most cases we find that once the gut is healed, raw milk is well digested. Regardless, once homemade broth is introduced, it will be a welcomed staple to your diet.  Both stock and broth can be made from the same bones. It is simple to begin your stock and after cooking for several hours, remove the carcass for deboning. Reserve the meat for eating and then return the bones to the pot with fresh water. Continue cooking for 6 to 48 hours, depending upon the type of bones. Stock and broth can be stored in the refrigerator for several days with the layer of fat on top to prevent oxidation or frozen in the freezer for several months. Unused stock or broth in the refrigerator may be reheated, cooled and returned to the refrigerator for several more days before consuming.

Fish Meat Stock

Ingredients

2 medium non-oily fish, such as sole or snapper
4 or more quarts of purified water
2 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar
Assortment of vegetables, as desired

  • 1-2 medium yellow onions
  • 2-4 carrots
  • 3-4 celery stalks

Bouquet garni (tie together using cooking twine)

  • Fresh bay leaf
  • Fresh thyme, rosemary, sage

Celtic Sea Salt, 1-2 teaspoons, to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking
Parsley, to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking

Instructions

Rinse fish in purified water. Remove meat from the fish and reserve for cooking. Place bones, fins, tails, skin and heads in the pot. Add remaining ingredients. Fill pot with purified water. Allow the pot and its contents to stand for 30 minutes, giving the raw apple cider vinegar time to draw minerals out of the bones. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 1 to 1 ½ hours.

Add parsley and salt during the last 10 minutes of cooking. Remove the fish bones and other large parts. Strain the stock. Set aside remaining ingredients for preparing fish broth (fish bone stock).

Chicken, Pheasant or Turkey Meat Stock

Ingredients

1 whole chicken, pheasant or turkey
2-4 chicken, pheasant or turkey feet, optional
1-2 chicken, pheasant or turkey heads, optional
4 or more quarts of purified water
2 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar
Assortment of vegetables, as desired

  • 1-2 medium yellow onions
  • 2-4 carrots
  • 3-4 celery stalks

Bouquet garni (tie together using cooking twine)

  • Fresh bay leaf
  • Fresh thyme, rosemary, sage

Celtic sea salt, 1-2 teaspoons, to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking
Parsley, to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking

Instructions

Rinse chicken, feet and heads in purified water. Cut whole chicken in half down the middle lengthwise. Place these in the pot. Add remaining ingredients. Fill pot with purified water. Allow the pot and its contents to stand for 30 minutes, giving the raw apple cider vinegar time to draw minerals out of the bones. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 1 ½ to 2 hours.

Add parsley and salt during the last 10 minutes of cooking. Remove the chicken and other large parts. Debone and reserve the meat for eating. It will be delicious. Strain the stock. Set aside remaining ingredients for preparing chicken bone broth (chicken bone stock).

Beef or Lamb Meat Stock

Ingredients

4-5 pounds of bone marrow and knuckle bones
3 pounds of meaty ribs or neck bones
1 calf’s foot, if available, cut into pieces (optional)
4 or more quarts of purified water
2 teaspoons Celtic sea salt
4 ounces raw apple cider vinegar
Assortment of vegetables, as desired

  • 1-2 medium yellow onions
  • 2-4 carrots
  • 3-4 celery stalks

1 teaspoon dried peppercorns, crushed
Bouquet garni (tie together using cooking twine)

  • Fresh bay leaf
  • Fresh thyme, rosemary, sage

Parsley, to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking

Instructions

Place the bones, meat and joints into a large pot. You may roast the meaty bones in a pan in an oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. You may roast the meaty bones in a roasting pan until well browned, for extra flavor. Place these in the pot. Add remaining ingredients. Fill pot with purified water. Allow the pot and its contents to stand for 60 minutes, giving the raw apple cider vinegar time to draw minerals out of the bones. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 3 to 4 hours.

Add parsley during the last 10 minutes of cooking. Remove the beef and other large parts. Debone and reserve the meat for eating. It will be delicious. Strain the stock. Set aside remaining ingredients for preparing beef or lamb bone broth.  Additional ingredients to consider for variety would be garlic, ginger and lemon rind, to name a few. Avoid adding starchy vegetables to your stock.

Bone Broth (Bone Stock) Recipes

To make bone stock (broth) you may follow the above recipes and after deboning, add additional purified water and continue cooking according to these recommendations:

  • Fish Bone Broth – simmer for 4 hours.
  • Chicken, Pheasant or Turkey Bone Broth – simmer for 12 to 24 hours.
  • Beef or Lamb Bone Broth – simmer for 36 to 48 hours.

Bon appetit!

About the Author

Kim Schuette has been in private practice in the field of nutrition since 1999. She earned her license as a Certified Nutritionist in 2002. In 2002, Kim established Biodynamic Wellness, now located in Solana Beach, California, which staffs four additional nutritionists whom she has mentored. Her love for organic gardening, gourmet cooking and healing through foods and real food‐based nutritional therapies led her into a practice where she offers private consultations specializing in nutritional and biotherapeutic drainage therapy to address gut/bowel and digestive disorders, male and female hormonal imbalances, autism, ADD/ADHD challenges and a myriad of other health concerns.

In 2011 after using the GAPS Diet in her practice for over five years, Kim became a Certified GAPS Practitioner under the training of Dr. Natasha Campbell‐McBride MD. Additionally Kim has been trained in hair mineral analysis, salivary hormone balancing and blood chemistry assessment.

Kim teaches numerous workshops centered on the work of Drs. Weston Price and Melvin Page. Her workshop topics range from children’s health and female hormonal concerns to transitioning to a whole foods diet. She serves as co‐leader of the San Diego Chapter of the Weston A. Price Foundation. She is the mother of three healthy children (two adults and one teenager). Kim resides in Encinitas, California with her husband and their youngest son.  Kim can be reached at her website Biodynamicwellness.com

 

Sources and More Information

Bone Broth and MSG: What You Need to Know

Healthy and Easy Bouillon Cubes Recipe

Lead in Bone Broth?

My Youtube playlist of over ten videos on all aspects of making bone broth

How to Make Turkey Stock

The Healthiest and Best Bone Broth

How to Make Duck Stock

How to Make Beef and Chicken Stock

How to Make Shrimp Stock

5 Reasons Why Your Stock Won’t Gel

The Perfect Simmer on Your Bone Broth

Picture Credit

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