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Careful anthropological study of ancestral societies reveals a surprising truth. Healthy, chronic disease-free traditional cultures who ate grains did so only after careful processing. The methods employed included sprouting, soaking, and/or sour leavening (sourdough). This thoughtful preparation was employed to remove potent anti-nutrients and break down complex food molecules contained in all grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes. …

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Traditional foodies know that feeding sourdough starter regularly is necessary to keep it active, bubbly and healthy. What if you are going on vacation or simply need to stop making sourdough bread for awhile, however? Life happens after all! In those cases, it is important to know the protocol for storing sourdough starter properly. Taking the necessary …

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As awareness of the benefits of sourdough bread increases, so does the potential for food manufacturers – both large and small – to exploit the term. And exploit it they most certainly do! I recently examined every single loaf of bread at a local healthfood store. I found only one out of over half a …

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Greek yogurt is the latest “it” food, and for once, the positive reputation is well deserved! When properly made, it is a good source of protein and probiotics, although Greek yogurt compared to regular yogurt is a lower source of minerals. This is the nutritional effect of removing most of the mineral-rich whey, which results in the …

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Yeast was first introduced as a substitute for sourdough starter in breadmaking at the court of Louis XIV of France in March 1668. Scientists at the time already knew that this substitution would harm public health by reducing the digestibility and nutritional value of bread. Their counsel resulted in an initial and vehement rejection of the idea. …

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Imagine it is five hundred years ago and you find yourself traveling across the northern plains during the winter. Temperatures are well below freezing. Wind is strong. Water is scarce, food even scarcer. What would you eat? Where would you find it? Would it be nourishing enough to sustain you? Native Americans understood and had …

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Help! There’s mold on my ferment! This is the most frequent question I receive from people learning to culture probiotic and enzyme-rich foods and beverages in their home for the very first time. Frequently, the email is tinged with concern and for good reason. Fermenting food takes time and costs money. No one wants to …