Fish Eggs: Superior Vitamin D Boost

by Sarah Healthy LivingComments: 128

fish eggs are extremely high in Vitamin D

Are fish eggs, also referred to as fish roe, a better choice than Vitamin D drops?

Vitamin D is surely the darling of supplements at the moment.  More and more exciting news keeps coming out about this Wonder Vitamin and its beneficial effects in reducing the chances of many kinds of cancer, heart disease, and autoimmune disorders.  The research is simply too groundbreaking to ignore.

I wrote a couple of posts last year about how the seasonal flu is really just Vitamin D deficiency disease and why I take a fermented cod liver oil supplement every day even when I get good doses of midday Florida sunshine. I find the role of Vitamin D in the body and its ability to preserve health and reduce inflammation of all kinds very exciting.

Even conventional doctors are  jumping on the bandwagon and more frequently testing their patients’ Vitamin D levels and recommending supplementation as most Americans have levels way too low to reap any Vitamin D health benefits.  By some estimates, over 90% of Americans are deficient in this critical nutrient.

While I think the enthusiasm over Vitamin D is wonderful, I personally do not feel comfortable with the casual way that high dose Vitamin D supplements are being recommended by healthcare professionals and eagerly consumed by an ever expanding public at large.

In some ways, it seems almost like Vitamin D has become just another drug!

Taking a single vitamin or nutrient in isolation is a practice that should be used with caution especially with Vitamin D which is fat soluble and can result in blood levels that are toxic.

For this reason, the Weston A. Price Foundation, with which I am in complete agreement, recommends a daily cod liver oil supplement.  A whole food source like cod liver oil supplies not only Vitamin D, but also Vitamin A and other nutritional cofactors which work synergistically to prevent toxicity (not all brands are created equal, though, so click here to find good ones to try).

But wait!

What if  your Vitamin D blood levels are so low that you can’t take enough cod liver oil each day to bring them up very quickly?

What if you live in a climate where getting a decent dose of midday UVB sunshine to produce Vitamin D via the skin is not an option for a substantial portion of the year?

Clearly, taking more than a teaspoon or two of cod liver oil each day to try and boost Vitamin D levels is not the answer in these situations.  Too much cod liver oil each day results in consuming too many omega 3 fatty acids.  Too many omega 3 fats is just as bad as too little as both scenarios result in inflammatory conditions in the body.

In those instances, then, larger doses of Vitamin D are obviously required in addition to the daily dose of cod liver oil.

However, there is a better and safer way to increase your Vitamin D blood levels quickly without those potentially dangerous high dose Vitamin D drops and pills!

Fish Eggs:  Traditional Sacred Food to the Rescue

Fish eggs, also known as fish roe, were highly prized by the natives of South America who would sometimes travel hundreds of miles from their mountain villages down to the sea to procure it in dried form.  This superfood was then provided to women of childbearing age to ensure healthy and robust babies and children.

The Eskimos also consumed fish roe from a number of fish species, particularly salmon.  Fish eggs were dried for consumption during winter months and for special feeding to pregnant women.

It is no wonder fish roe was so highly prized by isolated natives.  According to an analysis carried out by the Weston A. Price Foundation, a single tablespoon of fish roe contains approximately 17,000 international units of vitamin D! In addition, fish roe contains vitamins A, K2, zinc, iodine, and the brain supporting omega 3 fatty acid DHA in ample amounts.

One tablespoon of fish eggs, then, supplies a similar amount of Vitamin D as a midday dose of Vitamin D on the skin!

Vitamin A and particularly Vitamin K2 work synergistically with Vitamin D to prevent toxicity and overcalcification of the soft tissues, bones, heart, and/or kidneys, hallmark symptoms of Vitamin D overdose.

Given this information, doesn’t it seem much more wise to use fish eggs as that big Vitamin D boost rather than potentially dangerous and untested Vitamin D drops and pills?

The truth is that no one really knows what the long term effects of taking large doses of Vitamin D in isolation will be.   Do you really want to be a guinea pig or do you want to use the safe and effective Vitamin D boost that the Eskimos and traditional mountain dwelling tribes of South America used when sunlight was not a readily available option?

Where to Get Fish Eggs?

I buy small glass jars of salmon roe at Fresh Market or higher end grocery stores for as little as ten to fifteen dollars.   Make sure you find roe without any preservatives or colors added.  The only ingredients should be fish roe, salt, and water.

If you can find a fresh or dried source of caviar, so much the better!

I love my salmon roe right off the spoon.  I eat 1/4 – 1/2 tsp in the morning with breakfast a few times a week. They are so salty and delightful.  If you aren’t sure you like it at first, try it a few more times as fish roe can sometimes be a bit of an acquired taste.

If you simply can’t get used to fish eggs off the spoon, try some topped on whole grain crackers with some creme fraiche.

In my mind, fish eggs are a much superior – and delicious method for quickly raising and maintaining optimal Vitamin D levels.

What is your favorite way to eat fish roe?   Do you like it off the spoon like I do?

 

Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

More Information

Signs of Vitamin D Deficiency Most People Miss

Comments (128)

  • Santhy

    The ‘more information’ link doesn’t work. Could you please provide a link to the source for this information? Thanks.

    May 18th, 2015 5:55 am Reply
  • Kerri

    Did the author ever give her source for the Vitamin D Content of Fish roe? I can find no sources that give these high numbers, or really any numbers at all, except the WAP foundation, and they have no sources for their numbers either. The only thing that I could find was the nutrition facts for a fish roe product that gives the vitamin d content as zero!

    So, could you please cite your source for your Vitamin D numbers? I fear you are misleading people with numbers pulled from thin air since several people have asked for your source and you have yet to provide it.

    March 20th, 2015 4:12 pm Reply
    • Sarah TheHealthyHomeEconomist

      Yes, it was sourced at the end and was based on testing by the Weston A. Price Foundation.

      March 20th, 2015 6:14 pm Reply
      • Peter

        Where is the source? I don’t see it in your blog post. There is just a link to another one of your blog posts. Does the WAPF have copies of the independent lab reports that they could post?

        May 18th, 2015 11:46 am Reply
      • Kerri

        Not sure if this went through the first time as the comment disappeared, but you say that the source for your claim of 17,000 per tablespoon is at the bottom of the post, but it’s not. Three other posters have asked you for the source, and you still keep answering the questions of others, but are not answering the question of your source for 17,000.

        In fact, one poster took you at your word and she said that using fish roe for her vitamin D has a ‘catastrophic’ effect on her Vitamin D levels.

        So, are you going to post a source or change your info? Or will you continue to allow others to follow possibly incorrect advice and possibly harm their health?

        I’m posting 2 sources that contradict these numbers.

        This site says there is no Vitamin D.

        nutritiondata.self.com/facts/finfish-and-shellfish-products/4098/2

        Here’s a peer reviewed study citing about 100 per tablespoon:

        advances.nutrition.org/content/4/4/453.full

        Another poster below posted a source that contradicts the 17,000 per tablespoon and has it at 68 IU’s per tablespoon. It’s here:

        ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/4554?fgcd=&manu=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=35&offset=&sort=&qlookup=roe

        So can you please provide the source since you’ve been asked multiple times, so that others are not harmed by this incorrect info? That’s what responsible journalism is about.

        Thank you.

        November 9th, 2015 12:59 pm Reply
  • Pingback: Fermented Cod Liver Oil is never heated or altered in any way!

  • Thea Steggall via Facebook

    I love fish eggs. I grew up eating that stuff.

    October 13th, 2014 5:45 pm Reply
  • Mary Ann McDonald Scoville via Facebook

    I can never find them. Tips on where to look?

    October 13th, 2014 3:22 pm Reply
  • Erika Kovacs via Facebook

    I’ve tried it twice but I can’t stand it. I nearly threw up the second time.

    October 13th, 2014 3:12 pm Reply
  • Jennifer Gunther Taylor via Facebook

    I love making deviled eggs and putting a spoonful on top. Adds wonderful color and flavor!

    October 13th, 2014 2:40 pm Reply
  • Phyllis Crews Copeland via Facebook

    Love fried fish eggs!!!!

    October 13th, 2014 1:02 pm Reply
    • blackdog

      Sorry but if you fry them you are destroying the very beneficial Omega 3 they contain.

      February 15th, 2015 4:43 am Reply
  • Isa Salazar via Facebook

    Yummm

    October 13th, 2014 10:55 am Reply
  • Gregory Lake via Facebook

    Would you take this in addition to Fermented Cod Liver oil?

    October 13th, 2014 10:43 am Reply
  • Laura Tripp Kessler via Facebook

    Is it ok for a person who is allergic to fish to eat fish eggs?

    October 13th, 2014 10:35 am Reply
  • Garnette

    Wondering how to prepare/store fish eggs that you harvested yourself? My partner does a lot of fishing locally (I live in Western Canada) and he will catch the occasional female fish full of eggs. He fishes in a clean local lake that usually has rainbow trout. I would like to try to use those fish eggs my self in cooking. Thanks!

    March 29th, 2014 5:15 pm Reply
  • Merv

    Would you discuss shad roe sometime? I just found some and discovered the taste is not very fishy at all if you cook it gently all the way through. But you should be careful not to eat too much at once, because it hits you like a ton of lead, with massive amounts of fat and protein. Would be interesting to see a cooking demo of that.

    March 22nd, 2014 9:27 pm Reply
    • merv

      I bought some of the salmon roe recently and it might’ve been off, it tasted like flax oil that had become linseed oil fit only for carpentry. And smelled more like turpentine than anything else. Bleh. Should I have returned it?

      March 22nd, 2014 9:29 pm Reply
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    December 18th, 2013 2:51 am Reply
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    October 9th, 2013 7:00 pm Reply
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    September 24th, 2013 7:11 pm Reply
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    August 23rd, 2013 5:12 pm Reply
  • Paula

    I’ve been taking FCLO and daily salmon roe since December and it’s had catastrophic effects on my vitamin D levels. I”ve just had a blood test and they’ve dropped by 50% from sufficient to deficient. I expect both are high in D2 rather than D3 and it’s been shown that D2 supplementation causes D3 levels to drop. I love what the FCLO does for my teeth and I”m sure the salmon roe is highly nutritious but they’re not a substitute for D3 supplements if you live at high latitudes.

    June 21st, 2013 8:05 pm Reply
  • Heather

    This is sooo interesting! I’ve been interested in trying fish roe, as it’s a fertility food, I’m really excited to try some. I see most people are asking questions about what type/brand, etc. I’m in the same bout.. guess I will ask around and see what people say :)

    June 3rd, 2013 9:25 pm Reply
  • Arlene

    When I was a young girl my greek grandmother used to fry saltwater fish quite often for lunch. She would always call us kids in for the meze of fish roe. I never knew then how wise she was. I have never had problems with my pregnancies or births and I make sure my kids get that roe no matter how small the fish-and sometimes they’re no bigger than anchovies! Thank goodness for all the grandparents in the world with wisdom beyond any university education-the wisdom of the aeons.

    May 13th, 2013 4:37 am Reply
  • gwong

    gwong March 3, 2013 at 9:44 pm
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    Dear Sarah,

    Thank you so much for this article and all the other very informative and great articles you’ve put up. I heard your lecture at the Oralhealth Summit and at the end of the talk, you mentioned fish eggs being one of the most important foods to eat, that along with fish head soup. I live close to a Chinese neighborhood and would go to a supermarket there to buy wild caught salmon heads. The up side is the heads are fresh and only cost $1.99 per pound. The down side is, though they’re labeled wild caught, next to the tray of heads are two trays of salmon fillets, one labeled wild caught and the other labeled farm raised, so since there is only one tray of heads, I assume that they just threw the wild caught and farm raised heads together. I tried to get some answers from the people at the fish counter, but no one knows whether they are wild or farm raised. They do have other fish heads specifically labeled wild caught next to fillets of that fish also labeled wild that you can purchase, so I went there last Thursday to see what they had to offered. On that day, there were some fresh salmon heads and next to them were the two trays of fillets, this time, both labeled wild. Taking that to be the only salmon available was wild, I bought one of the heads and to my delight, on the tray of heads were containers of fresh fish roe. Because of your recommendation, I bought a container. As soon as I got home, I took a spoonful. I had been eating raw liver for almost 10 months and have not found any adverse effects from it, and decided to eat the fish roe raw. I don’t know if I should have done that, but that night, as I was putting up some black out blinds, I broke out into a sweat. At that point, I didn’t think anything about it and continued working. The next day, I made some soup from the meat from the fish head that I had roasted and broth that I had made from the bones and put in some vegetable and about a tablespoon of fish roe and had it for dinner. Later I broke out into a sweat again. Again, I didn’t think much of it, till I saw some notes that I had taken from the Oral Health Summit mentioning that fish roe and sea food of all kinds had the ability to heal the thyroid. I had been dealing with low thyroid function for many years. I was always cold and the last few years, the condition became so severe that my fingers and toes would become numb and turn black as soon as I would get cold. I went to several, chiropractors and acupuncturist to resolve the issue and one of them told me that, a healthy body has moisture. In demonstration, he showed me his hand in comparison to my hands. His had a slight feeling of moisture on it and mine was absolutely dry. They are so dry that often times, I cannot even get a grip on a door knob to open it. So it was really amazing that a tablespoon of fish roe could do so much.

    I am so grateful for this discovery, but I would like to know if it’s OK to eat the fish eggs raw? As I said, I’ve been eating raw liver since April last year with no apparent problems. I divide them into single servings and freeze them and take out single servings as I use them. I plan to do the same with the fish eggs. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Again thank you for all your contributions.

    Cheui May

    March 3rd, 2013 9:58 pm Reply
  • gwong

    Dear Sarah,

    Thank you so much for this article and all the other very informative and great articles you’ve put up. I heard your lecture at the Oralhealth Summit and at the end of the talk, you mentioned fish eggs being one of the most important foods to eat, that along with fish head soup. I live close to a Chinese neighborhood and would go to a supermarket there to buy wild caught salmon heads. The up side is the heads are fresh and only cost $1.99 per pound. The down side is, though they’re labeled wild caught, next to the tray of heads are two trays of salmon fillets, one labeled wild caught and the other labeled farm raised, so since there is only one tray of heads, I assume that they just threw the wild caught and farm raised heads together. I tried to get some answers from the people at the fish counter, but no one knows whether they are wild or farm raised. They do have other fish heads specifically labeled wild caught next to fillets of that fish also labeled wild that you can purchase, so I went there last Thursday to see what they had to offered. On that day, there were some fresh salmon heads and next to them were the two trays of fillets, this time, both labeled wild. Taking that to be the only salmon available was wild, I bought one of the heads and to my delight, on the tray of heads were containers of fresh fish roe. Because of your recommendation, I bought a container. As soon as I got home, I took a spoonful. I had been eating raw liver for almost 10 months and have not found any adverse effects from it, and decided to eat the fish roe raw. I don’t know if I should have done that, but that night, as I was putting up some black out blinds, I broke out into a sweat. At that point, I didn’t think anything about it and continued working. The next day, I made some soup from the meat from the fish head that I had roasted and broth that I had made from the bones and put in some vegetable and about a tablespoon of fish roe and had it for dinner. Later I broke out into a sweat again. Again, I didn’t think much of it, till I saw some notes that I had taken from the Oral Health Summit mentioning that fish roe and sea food of all kinds had the ability to heal the thyroid. I had been dealing with low thyroid function for many years. I was always cold and the last few years, the condition became so severe that my fingers and toes would become numb and turn black as soon as I would get cold. I went to several, chiropractors and acupuncturist to resolve the issue and one of them told me that, a healthy body has moisture. In demonstration, he showed me his hand in comparison to my hands. His had a slight feeling of moisture on it and mine was absolutely dry. They are so dry that often times, I cannot even get a grip on a door knob to open it. So it was really amazing that a tablespoon of fish roe could do so much.

    I am so grateful for this discovery, but I would like to know if it’s OK to eat the fish eggs raw? As I said, I’ve been eating raw liver since April last year with no apparent problems. I divide them into single servings and freeze them and take out single servings as I use them. I plan to do the same with the fish eggs. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Again thank you for all your contributions.

    Cheui May

    March 3rd, 2013 9:44 pm Reply
  • Taylor@Best Multivitamin

    “……..While I think the enthusiasm over Vitamin D is wonderful, I personally do not feel comfortable with the casual way that high dose Vitamin D supplements are being recommended by healthcare professionals……… ” couldn’t agree with you more!

    March 1st, 2013 4:29 pm Reply
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    February 6th, 2013 7:37 pm Reply
  • Gdaiva

    9$/lb i’d assume its not salmon eggs, it might be cod or trout, but its still good to eat. Greeks make taramasalad with cod eggs, which is very delocious spread.

    November 16th, 2012 2:37 pm Reply
  • Sara Gordon

    Source – so I am trying to weed through the 90 odd comments but am having trouble finding a recommended, reputable source for the salmon roe. Can anyone help?

    November 15th, 2012 11:51 pm Reply
    • Sara Gordon

      Did we ever establish a source for wild caught from the ocean, not fresh water?

      November 15th, 2012 11:57 pm Reply
      • Heather

        I’m wondering the same…

        June 3rd, 2013 9:29 pm Reply
  • jason

    accept jusus to your lives

    October 29th, 2012 3:35 pm Reply
  • Chloe

    the Romanoff is in small glass jars not cans, by the way

    October 27th, 2012 3:51 pm Reply
  • Chloe

    I found Romanoff “caviar” whitefish roe at Walmart, $7 something for 2 oz. The ingredients are whitefish roe, salt, water, lemon juice concentrate, rice vinegar.

    Also 2 others by Romanoff, one was black and one was red, but the ingredients included dextrose, so I didn’t buy them.

    They were on the canned fish (sardines, tuna…) aisle. In southern california.

    What do you think of the whitefish roe, Sarah? Not just eggs and salt but… would they do? I hope you still read the comments so long after your original post. Thank you

    October 27th, 2012 3:50 pm Reply
  • Masha Ellis via Facebook

    I pay $9 for 50 g (that is 1/10 of an lb I believe) of salmon roe here in switzerland, but being russian and having a 3 year old means we just ignore the price and enjoy the good old “red caviar” as often as we can. The only challenge is to stick to one spoon a day -my daughter gobbles up the whole jar in one sitting…

    October 11th, 2012 4:45 pm Reply
  • Anna Louise Hallquist via Facebook

    Drool

    October 8th, 2012 6:57 pm Reply
  • Andrea Fahy via Facebook

    mmm and bacon grease! but yes, great cod liver oil too!

    October 8th, 2012 6:36 pm Reply
  • Joni Washek via Facebook

    @justica bear $9/lb is an EXCELLENT price… i pay $20-35/lb here in so cal

    October 8th, 2012 6:22 pm Reply
  • Adria Salvatore Torrez via Facebook

    ok wait…I asked before I read. :-) Now seeing the article, I see that the relationship to FCLO is addressed, thanks.

    October 8th, 2012 5:45 pm Reply
  • Stephanie

    A couple of years ago I was backpacking with friends high in the mountains, and we caught a trout. We fried it up with salt and pepper and it was the best fish I’ve ever eaten in my life. But sadly, it was full of eggs, and we didn’t know whether they were ok to eat, so we discarded them!!! :( I’ll never make that mistake again. If I’d eaten them I probably would have turned into Wonder Woman :)

    October 8th, 2012 5:42 pm Reply
  • Adria Salvatore Torrez via Facebook

    would this be a good alternative to FCLO, especially since there is a supply limit of Green Pastures FCLO/HVBO right now?

    October 8th, 2012 5:38 pm Reply
  • Mark AndHeidi Matthews via Facebook

    We catch fresh trout here in Idaho… can we eat the eggs we find in them?? Is it only salmon eggs that are the best?

    October 8th, 2012 5:19 pm Reply
  • Justicia Bear via Facebook

    I’m planning to order some of this. I found a greek food site online that sells 1lb for $9. Is that a good price. Also, Can you refer me to any sites that specialize in nutrient-dense foods for pregnant women? Thanks!

    October 8th, 2012 4:38 pm Reply
  • thehealthyhomeeconomist via Facebook

    @Sofia unfortunately the source article for this blog is on a website that was recently hacked … check back. I understand from the webmaster that they are working as quickly as possible to clean things up.

    October 8th, 2012 4:22 pm Reply
  • Mark Felton via Facebook

    I’ll put it on my shopping list after the grass-fed filet mignon

    October 8th, 2012 4:21 pm Reply
  • Sofia Grogan via Facebook

    Sarah, please list the sources in the article or in a comment. I clicked the link and my computer sent up a malware alert. I guess WAP site is still not safe until they fix all the malware issues.

    October 8th, 2012 3:44 pm Reply
  • 20 something allergies via Facebook

    We have to eat them frozen. I freeze them individually and take them like pills, and my 4 year old likes to munch on them. Where there’s a will, there’s a way!

    October 8th, 2012 3:25 pm Reply
  • Gdaiva

    Wow! I read many of your articles and watched youtubes, but only today I found this article about salmon roe, or we call it red caviar. Fortunately, I live in Alaska for 4 years now and can make my own red caviar. It is super delicious to me, I eat it with chicken eggs in any form (boiled, fried, omelets, etc.), potatoes, bread, vegetables, super duper delicious with avocados, tomatoes, cucumbers.
    I didn’t know it has so much vitamin D. Thank you for the article.
    If you want less expensive red caviar than in whole foods, you can get it at any Russian store, they even sell it by pound, there are a stores few in Florida, I used to live there.

    June 15th, 2012 9:18 pm Reply
  • Chantelle

    I also eat it straight off the spoon like you.(I had had it before thinking of using it for this purpose so I knew I was going to like it) I was able to buy some salmon roe at a good price from the sushi chef inside a higher end grocery. I am going to visit the Asian market soon to check out their selection as I expect I will find lots of types there.

    May 23rd, 2012 6:11 am Reply
  • Melinda

    What about crab roe? My Korean market has beautiful orange very sweet tasting crab roe very inexpensively priced. The owner walked me to the crab to make sure I understood his answer to the question, “fish egg?” since I speak no Korean.

    March 20th, 2012 2:41 am Reply
  • Greg

    Hi – I doubt very much that salmon roe or any other fish roe has 17,000 IU/tsp. This seems totally unlikely. You should check your sources before publishing something like this. The WAPF is way way off on this. According to the USDA Nutrient Database (http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/4515?fg=&man=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=&qlookup=roe), fish roe will get you 137 IU/oz. You would have to eat a whole cup just to get 1100 IU. That’s a lot of fish roe! If there exists fish roe on this planet that has 17000 IU/tsp, let me know where and how I can get it…

    March 15th, 2012 11:16 pm Reply
  • Carluta

    I’ve always loved roe being Japanese. We recently bought a pound of wild sockeye roe for 15$ right off the boat. We cure it ourselves at home. It tastes way better than cod liver oil, and all the cod liver oil that’s readily available to us is pasturized and reloaded with soy oil. It’s also 40$ a bottle! Not only is our roe fresh from the ocean and delicious, it’s way cheaper and healthier!!

    March 13th, 2012 11:08 pm Reply
  • deb b

    Hi – Also interested in Vit D content of salmon roe. Nutrition data.com (gov. database) has no Vit D listed. It must have SOME (but 17,000 per oz. seems awfully high). Also – Salmon Roe is WAY over priced at WF. Try to find a more “ethnic” market (especially catering to E. Europeans/Russians). The price has gone up A LOT in the last year (was about $19.00 per pound), but now its $32-$33). This is for frozen/thawed – which I think has to be better than the jars (which might be pasteurized).

    February 28th, 2012 2:04 pm Reply
  • Isabella Petrie

    As a Certified Clinical Nutritionist, we knew about the link between Vitamin D and degenerative diseases 10 years ago. It’s great that most doctors are now testing for deficiency. Even if you get enough sun, however, you may not be able to process the Vitamin D to its active form. With bodies, it’s often not that simple.

    February 26th, 2012 11:17 pm Reply
  • Erin

    Sarah,
    Do you think this would be a good product to get: http://www.amazon.com/Bottarga-Muggine-Grey-Mullet-Roe/dp/B000C1U83Q/ref=pd_sim_sbs_gro_4
    It looks like it’s traditionally dried. I’m new to purchasing fish roe!
    Thank you!

    February 4th, 2012 3:22 pm Reply
  • Raquel

    My husband is from Ukraine so my mother in law serves fish eggs on bread with lots of butter. I don’t like the taste but my 2 DDs eat them right off the spoon! My older DD always wants more so sometimes I will let her have a heaping tbsp of them and thats still not enough, lol.

    December 31st, 2011 2:50 pm Reply
  • Kristina

    Can you link to a source on the amounts of vitamin d there are in roe? I looked on the Weston Price Foundation and found that sturgeon roe (3.5 ounces) has 232 IU. Thanks.

    December 20th, 2011 6:21 pm Reply
  • JP

    I LOVE fish eggs! Sourdough bread with LOTS of butter and fish eggs on top. Yummy!

    October 14th, 2011 8:59 pm Reply
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  • Meaghan

    We are fortunate to live relatively close to the Atlantic Ocean and are able to purchase our seafood fresh off the boats. I thought I’d share one group we were part of, in case there is anyone else on here from Massachusetts: http://www.capeannfreshcatch.org/index.html

    July 1st, 2011 1:08 pm Reply
  • Bess

    Because of this post I bought some fish eggs.
    I really didn’t like them, but I know how nutritious they are and important for me, as I am breastfeeding. Then the idea struck me – why don’t I put them in my kefir smoothie. Normally, I add farm fresh egg yolk to my smoothie. (but I am out at the moment) Since the fish eggs are a bit salty, I skipped adding my pinch of sea salt that I would normally add and added a bit more berries.
    So I am drinking my smoothie with fish eggs as I speak, and it taste great! Not fishy at all.
    Can’t wait to make one for my husband, who is a picky eater; I try to get as much healthy stuff in him as possible without him knowing it.

    June 15th, 2011 9:31 am Reply
  • Tracey Stirling

    Hi Sarah,

    I recently ordered fresh salmon roe from my market. I had to order a pound in order to get it so I figured I’d freeze it in an ice cube tray and thaw as needed. What I didn’t know is that when it is fresh, it comes in large strips and the eggs are all stuck together by a slimy membrane. Do you know of a convenient way to get the mebrane off? I cut the strips in chunks to freeze in cubes as at the time I could not sit and peel each egg individually off the membrane from the entire pound. When I tried I had a slimy gushy mess. I’m hoping when I thaw the cubes the eggs won’t be too difficult to get off. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    Tracey

    May 30th, 2011 12:23 am Reply
  • Alicia

    Hi Sarah. My son is 8 1/2 months old (breastfed). He’s been getting drops of the FCLO for 2 months now (in his daycare bottles), thank you. I recently purchased frozen roe from Vital Choice. It comes in 6 oz containers. I plan to thaw small amounts at a time since he will not consume 6 oz in one week. I’m hoping you can answer a few questions on preparation. Once thawed, do I feed it to him raw? Whole eggs or mashed? Lastly, what would you recommend as a serving size? In the last month, any veggie I’ve prepared for him, has been pureed and less than an ounce per serving. Taking it slow with him. I sure would appreciate any help here. You play a major role in my family’s nutrition, and I’m so grateful for your knowledge! Thank you, Sarah. : )

    May 27th, 2011 4:19 pm Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      You can give them to him as is – just a few at a time as a finger food.

      June 4th, 2011 9:41 am Reply
      • Alicia

        Thank you. : )

        July 13th, 2011 1:29 pm Reply
  • Tamara Ward via Facebook

    I went out and splurged on some fish eggs last night for myself and the kiddos. Thanks for this post!

    May 27th, 2011 10:22 am Reply
  • Julie Leon via Facebook

    My sons pediatrician said the same thing, Vitamin D drops for newborn daily. We’ve only been doing it a few times a week, because I’m iffy on it too. He is exclusively breastfed. She said they’re recommending this for all newborns. Thoughts???

    May 27th, 2011 7:37 am Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      Just my lay opinion, but I wouldn’t be giving those drops. Just make sure your diet is high in D and he will get all he needs from your breastmilk. Make sure you get some sun too if possible. If not, fish eggs would be good to have in the diet.

      June 4th, 2011 9:39 am Reply
  • Laura

    My pediatrician prescribed vitamin D drops for my newborn. i haven’t had the Rx filled yet because this was never something my 4 other children were given. What do you know about this and what would your suggestion be?

    May 26th, 2011 3:32 pm Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      Vitamin D drops for a newborn? I am shocked. Are you breastfeeding? Have you yourself been tested for Vitamin D levels? I would consult with a holistic doctor for sure and get another professional opinion. If it were my baby, I would breastfeed and make sure my own diet was full of vitamin D rich foods like traditional mothers practiced. I know all the studies say that breastmilk has no vitamin D in it but this is because nearly all Mothers are deficient in vitamin D.

      May 26th, 2011 4:20 pm Reply
  • Weldon Williford via Facebook

    Also, go stand outside in the middle of winter naked, especially up north and see how long you can stand it. They have also proven that you don’t make vitamin D much above latitude of Virginia after November.

    May 26th, 2011 1:35 pm Reply
  • Weldon Williford via Facebook

    I am a whole foods person, but enough of the anti-supplement garbage. There are orthomolecular doctors who have been using vitamins and minerals for now over 20-30 years to successfully and naturally treat many diseases and disorders. I guess ignorant supplementation would not be a good idea, but most people have a brain and the internet to arrive at correct dosages and combinations.

    May 26th, 2011 1:34 pm Reply
  • Catherine Garbus via Facebook

    sun sun sun

    May 26th, 2011 12:43 pm Reply
  • Lauren

    Facebook seems to have a stammer today 😉
    I serve devilled eggs with little dollops of salmon roe and horseradish on top, or just use taramasalata instead of mayo in the devilled egg yolks. As a side or a light lunch with green salad we – adults and toddler – love them!

    May 26th, 2011 12:42 pm Reply
  • Angela W. Rogers via Facebook

    @Ashley, if your baby is breastfed, I would think YOU taking the Vit D drops would be good enough. That’s what our holistic pediatrician recommended for my baby and me. It will pass on to the baby thru your milk.

    May 26th, 2011 12:34 pm Reply
  • Angela W. Rogers via Facebook

    Something to think about. We are all on D3 drops. I know WAP recommends nursing moms take 20K IU’s of Vit A! I’m taking that, but not from a whole food source. I wonder if that is problematic.

    May 26th, 2011 12:32 pm Reply
  • Samantha Juslin Gerrits via Facebook

    Besides CLO, there is really nothing you can eat to give you vitamin D3. However, you can bask in the sun during the middle of the day assuming you are in a good area at the right time of the year.

    May 26th, 2011 12:15 pm Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      The fermented cod liver oil is actually mostly D2.

      May 26th, 2011 2:08 pm Reply
  • Melissa Duey via Facebook

    I eat fish eggs but I am wondering about quality. The ones that I get have been salted (salt cured?) and I was wondering what kind of impact this might have on the health of the eggs…?

    May 26th, 2011 11:43 am Reply
  • Carma L Coleman via Facebook

    @Phthalo, this whole post is referring to supplements. Supplements are derived from the vitamins and nutrients that come from our food. I’m not an advocate of vitamins or herbs in supplement form generally. I’m not sure what you’re assuming there. Respectfully.

    May 26th, 2011 11:41 am Reply
  • Ashley Chenard via Facebook

    Good to know. Pediatrician prescribed Vit D drops for my 2wk old bc shes exclusively breastfed, was at WIC office for lactation support too and they backed him up but Ive been feeling iffy on it all.

    May 26th, 2011 11:35 am Reply
  • Phthalo Blue via Facebook

    @Carma: not everyone that eats well is healthy. I probably eat healthier than anyone on this site and my body does not absorb the vitamins and minerals from the food. Don’t assume that eating healthy is equated with BEING healthy.

    May 26th, 2011 11:35 am Reply
  • Carma L Coleman via Facebook

    Link to GAPS info? Haven’t heard of it.

    May 26th, 2011 11:28 am Reply
  • Alyssa Pilat via Facebook

    By the way, thank you for showing me GAPS, your blog is my nutrition bible.

    May 26th, 2011 11:27 am Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      Good luck with GAPS Alyssa. It is quite the adventure! :)

      May 26th, 2011 2:06 pm Reply
  • Alyssa Pilat via Facebook

    yes my mum was telling someone to take high doses of vit d3 and magnesium today and i was trying to explain about Gaps and how it’s more important to get your gut working properly so that your food becomes your nutrition. those things are a quick fix and possibly dangerous in the long term, nutrition is the key. I am starting gaps intro on monday, I’ve been researching it for a year and am very excited, and all prepared.

    May 26th, 2011 11:27 am Reply
  • Carma L Coleman via Facebook

    Eat right and no supplements are needed!

    May 26th, 2011 11:25 am Reply
  • Melissa @ Dyno-mom

    I am also in the camp of folks who never had it before and want to incorporate it. Any good recommendations of brands or varieties?

    May 25th, 2011 11:48 pm Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      Just don’t eat freshwater roe as it doesn’t contain the same nutrients as ocean based roe like iodine.

      May 26th, 2011 7:19 am Reply
      • Eryn

        “Just don’t eat freshwater roe as it doesn’t contain the same nutrients as ocean based roe like iodine.”

        Don’t eat it, as there is something wrong with it, or don’t eat it hoping for those nutrients, as it doesn’t compare in this way?

        Thanks for the clarification :)

        June 2nd, 2011 6:39 pm Reply
        • Liz

          I’d like to know why also, as I just found a reputable source for wild caught, freshwater salmon roe.

          Thanks!

          June 3rd, 2011 6:05 pm Reply
        • Emily

          Not knowing the intent of Sarah’s statement, I wanted to chime in with my own thoughts as this is something I have been researching lately. She may have other reasons for avoiding freshwater roe. There are 5 ways to obtain “seafood”.

          1. Catch it in the ocean (the best because it has nutrients that other fish and seafood would not have.
          2. Catch it in a natural stream or lake or other freshwater body. It wouldn’t have the same nutrients that #1 does, but would be a decent protein source.
          3. Farm it responsibly. For example, a farmer friend has some freshwater shrimp and talapia ponds and puts solar-powered lights above the water to attract bugs to the surface that the fish eat. It wouldn’t have the same nutrients that #1 does, but would be a decent protein source.
          4. Caged in the ocean. Supposedly there is a dead zone on the ocean floor beneath them and they are fed inappropriate food and treated with chemicals.
          5. Caged in freshwater ponds and fed inappropriate food and treated with chemicals.

          Strangely, all of these could be labeled “Wild Caught” if they were caught in a manner that employed boats and hooks or nets, just like how you would catch fish in the wild. You can also call “seafood” wild (different that wild caught) if the farmed spices is the same (or similar hybrid) as the variety found in the wild. Most (all??) of what you see in supermarkets and even some health food stores is farmed and labeled as wild or wild caught. So basically, if you don’t know and trust the people who did the catching, you don’t know what you have.

          After finding out the other day that my roe came from a freshwater source, I spent a lot of time on the internet looking for roe that came from a fish caught in the ocean. So far, I have had no luck. If anyone has roe from source #1 above, I would love to know where you got it!

          June 3rd, 2011 6:48 pm Reply
  • Chris

    Are there any issues with Mercury?

    May 25th, 2011 11:02 pm Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      Not that I have seen any research on anywhere. Of course, get your roe from a clean source if at all possible.

      May 26th, 2011 2:05 pm Reply
  • Gabriella

    It seems like whenever I tell people that I take cod liver oil and greens powder instead of synthetic vitamins they look at me like I have two heads. Superfoods are soooo much better than isolated nutrients! Unfortunately I don’t care for fish eggs, but my friend has a recipe for a dip made with roe, olive oil, and sourdough bread pureed together and it is delicious!

    May 25th, 2011 8:17 pm Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      Gabriella, could you please ask your friend to share her recipe! I would love to have that one!

      May 25th, 2011 8:51 pm Reply
  • jean finch

    What a great idea! I do not eat gluten so had not thought about fish roe in a while but do want to keep my d up! We sun at midday and I take suppliments so I will try this with yogurt and eggs!
    Thanks for speaking of fatty liver disease I had just read Chris MasterJohns article and it was a great reveiw! You are a treasure!

    Jean finch

    May 25th, 2011 8:07 pm Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      I am in absolute awe of Chris Masterjohn’s work!

      May 25th, 2011 8:12 pm Reply
  • Paula

    Yesterday for lunch I had some sauerkraut with homemade mayo (a cole slaw of sorts) sprinkled with salmon roes. Delicious!

    May 25th, 2011 6:51 pm Reply
  • Sarah Smith

    Ah, I’ve been wondering about fish roe because my youngest (15 months old) is not a fan of the FCLO. Maybe he’ll like fish eggs until he reaches the age where I can more “force” him to take his daily dose. Thanks!

    May 25th, 2011 6:03 pm Reply
  • Megan

    Is this the same kind of fish eggs put on some sushi rolls? We get sushi from time to time, even when pregnant, as a bit of a treat if we’re dining out. I usually asked for cooked rolls if I’m expecting, but just this past week I had sushi and wasn’t sure if all the rolls were cooked (what’s your opinion on that – raw fish while pregnant?) but I definitely saw those little orange beads on my sushi!
    I’m happy to consume fish; I was thinking it might make up for my helter-skelter FCLO consumption while we were traveling, but I was very curious about the effects of uncooked sushi on a fetus. Of course, I have had crumbled cheeses too (like bleu & gorgonzola) and wondered if those were really no-nos. As you probably know, “unpasteurized milk is not recommended” by most medical personnel but WAPF says otherwise. Just curious about the cheese & fish though. Thanks, Sarah!

    May 25th, 2011 4:21 pm Reply
    • Michele

      When I lived in Japan, I ate sushi a lot when I was pregnant and had five healthy children! I knew the raw fish I ate was very fresh. My ob/gyn never told me not to eat raw fish. I think it depends on the source and freshness of the fish and roe.

      May 25th, 2011 7:07 pm Reply
  • Ashley

    I didn’t know about traditional diets while I was pregnant but I craved salmon roe like crazy. I made my husband buy me a pound of it a few times and I ate it with big spoonfuls of Russian style sour cream. I figured it had omega 3s but I had no idea at the time it was a baby making food. Cheers to listening to your body!

    May 25th, 2011 2:43 pm Reply
    • Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

      Ashley, LOVE your story. I used to drink soymilk before getting pregnant with my first baby .. when I got pregnant I inexplicably couldn’t drink my beloved soymilk anymore. I’m sure now looking back that it was my body rejecting it as it would have been dangerous for me to drink it as it suppresses the thyroid and a strong thyroid is so important for a healthy pregnancy.

      May 26th, 2011 2:04 pm Reply
  • Linda

    I’m glad you just posted this. We are going to the beach in a week and I was thinking I won’t need to take my fclo since I’ll be out in the sun a lot. After reading this it sounds like I better take it. I haven’t tried fish eggs yet, but you have convinced to get some. I know over winter I don’t get enough sun so I’m glad fish eggs are the answer.

    May 25th, 2011 12:24 pm Reply
  • Benaan

    Hello Sarah,

    I am pretty new when it comes to roe, but I would love to learn more about it so I can incorporate it into my family’s diet. Please excuse my few dumb questions:
    ~Is salmon roe (the kind that is orangy color) already “cooked”, or is it “raw”. Does it need to be cooked? Will that destroy any nutrients?
    ~Any suggestions about how to get kids to eat it? Has anyone tried the roe cakes recipe from nourishing traditions (pg. 316?)
    Thanks in advance!

    May 25th, 2011 12:20 pm Reply
    • Linda

      I tried her recipe for simple shad roe for the 1st time. It was a bit unusual but I think if I had it more often I would get to like it.

      May 25th, 2011 5:10 pm Reply
  • Kate @ Modern Alternative Mama

    Haven’t tried fish eggs yet, just taking my FCLO and getting outside. Interesting though….

    May 25th, 2011 12:13 pm Reply
  • Erica

    Hi Sarah,

    Are Krinos and Castella good brands for fish roe? I’ve called Castella, and they’ve stated that their fish roe is unpasteurized and unprocessed.

    Thank!

    May 25th, 2011 11:00 am Reply
    • Emily

      Hi, I’m not Sarah, but have been using Krinos for years. The only ingredient is carp roe. The Carp Roe Dip (Taramosalata) looks similar, but contains soy oil, so you have to be careful not to grab it by mistake as I once did.

      This post did get me to wondering if it is ocean carp or farmed carp. I have an email into the company, but since you can label farmed seafood as wild, I’m not sure their answer will tell me much.

      May 27th, 2011 12:10 pm Reply
      • Erica

        Thanks Emily! I can’t believe it is so hard to find wild caught fish now. How do we know if seafood and fish are truly wild caught?

        May 28th, 2011 1:14 pm Reply
        • Emily

          Krinos just got back with me and they are freshwater carp. Bummer!!

          We buy our shrimp, fish, fish heads, and oysters directly from a family-owned seafood market that has their own boats and we’ve seen the boats and spoken extensively with the family. Since you can’t rely on labeling, meeting the source is the only way I feel comfortable buying seafood.

          May 31st, 2011 6:21 pm Reply
          • Rebecca C

            I’m confused about the freshwater versus salt water thing. Carp is a freshwater fish, they do not live in the ocean. Will i not get sufficient vitamin D from carp roe because it is freshwater, or because it is farmed? What makes there not be sufficient vitamin D?

            February 27th, 2013 2:31 am
  • christin

    Salmon roe was one of my babies 1st finger foods. They love to grab the tiny eggs. Way better than cereal “O”‘s…Yuck!

    May 25th, 2011 10:56 am Reply
  • Julie

    Yesterday I was at our local Market Basket and saw a greek fish roe–this one uses carp roe. It was a good price, but didn’t know anything about carp, so I didn’t purchase. Do you know anything about carp roe, Sarah? Should I be looking for salmon roe in particular?

    May 25th, 2011 10:47 am Reply
    • Constantinos

      Hi Julie, I eat taramosalata (which is made of carp roe eggs, olive oil, onions, lemon and bread or potatoes during the fasting periods (half the year). It’s an excellent food and very tasty, too. Go for it!

      June 3rd, 2011 1:38 pm Reply
  • Colleen

    Very timely here. Last night I added roe to my grocery order to be delivered tomorrow. I started GAPs and I plan to put them on some scrambled eggs.

    May 25th, 2011 10:23 am Reply
  • Soli @ I Believe in Butter

    For a while I was regularly snacking on brown rice crackers with creme fraiche and roe on them. Since I’m off dairy and grains as I transition into the body ecology diet, this is now out. I’ve been buying roe at Ikea, but they put extra junk in them. I’m going to be on the lookout for better quality roe now, in addition to writing to Ikea and chiding them for doing this to such a nutritious food.

    May 25th, 2011 9:59 am Reply
  • Stanley Fishman

    Fish eggs are a terrific food. I have come to love the taste, and eat it right off the spoon just like you do.

    Russians, who truly appreciate fish eggs, will eat them with plenty of butter on small pieces of toast, or cover them with sour cream. But many appreciate the fish eggs just by themselves.

    It takes a while to get used to the taste, but you will come to love it, as your body learns how to absorb the wonderful nutrients.

    May 25th, 2011 9:23 am Reply
  • Lovelyn

    Fish roe is delicious. I can eat it straight of the spoon, but I also like to sprinkle it on my eggs in the morning.

    May 25th, 2011 8:00 am Reply

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