Sulphur: The Forgotten Nutrient

by Sarah Healthy LivingComments: 168
sulphur deficiency is serious business
Sulphur Crystals

A neighbor of mine who is in his 70’s, looks 50, and still jogs regularly once told me that his mother used to make him drink well water that stunk to high heaven of rotten eggs.

That rotten egg smell is, of course, hard water with high amounts of sulphur in it.  She told him that it would boost his immune system and keep him healthy.

Smart lady.

Unfortunately, sulphur has been all but forgotten as a critical nutrient in recent decades, yet this important element is very necessary for the maintenance of health and even prevention of chronic illnesses such as Metabolic Syndrome.

Shockingly, a Minimum Daily Requirement (MDR) to avoid sulphur deficiency does not even exist despite the fact that this mineral is the eighth most common element by mass in the human body.

Countries With High Sulphur Intake Are Some of the Healthiest

Is it coincidental that Greece, Italy, and Japan – countries that are the primary suppliers of sulphur to the rest of the world, enjoy some of the lowest rates of heart disease, obesity and increased longevity on the planet?

Perhaps not.  Icelanders’ remarkably low rates of depression, obesity, diabetes, and heart disease can possibly be attributed to the line of volcanoes that formed that island nation and whose eruptions periodically blanket the soil with sulphur containing volcanic rock.

It was once thought that the Icelandic diet was so protective against chronic illness due to a high intake of fish.  This theory does not apparently hold up, however, as Icelanders who move to Canada and continue eating a lot of fish do not continue to enjoy the same low rates of disease.

It seems that the Icelandic soil which is unusually rich in sulphur may indeed play a pivotal role in the health and avoidance of sulfur deficiency of its residents.

Sulphur’s Critical Role in the Body

Sulphur is critical to many of the body’s biological processes, metabolism included.

Without adequate sulphur, glucose metabolism becomes defective and muscle and fat cells are damaged as the result of becoming glucose intolerant.   This is how sulphur deficiency can lead to all manner of skeletal and muscle disorders with corresponding pain and inflammation.

This impaired glucose metabolism resulting from insufficient sulphur is also implicated as a factor in obesity and the dangerous condition known as Metabolic Syndrome because one way the body compensates for defective glucose metabolism is by gaining weight.

When sulphur deficiency occurs within the context of a lowfat diet, the problem becomes more serious as the additional sources of glucose present in a lowfat diet in the form of carboydrates are converted to fat and even worse, released into the bloodstream as triglycerides as fuel for the damaged and inflamed muscle cells.

Alzheimer’s Disease Partly Due to Sulphur Deficiency?

Analysis of the minerals present in the cells of the typical Alzheimer’s patient reveals that sulphur is almost nonexistent compared with a normal profile.

Some research has indicated that reversal of this deficiency state can not only prevent or halt the progression of this horrible disease but even reverse it provided the patient is still in the early stages where little brain damage has occurred.

Could the skyrocketing cases of Alzheimer’s in recent years be related to the shunning of eggs, a very good source of sulphur, by older Americans?

Sulphur Helps Mobilize Vitamin D from the Sun?

When unprotected skin is exposed to the sun, the skin synthesizes vitamin D3 sulfate.   While vitamin D is normally considered fat soluble, vitamin D3 sulfate is a form of the vitamin that is actually water soluble.   This allows this type of vitamin D to travel freely in the blood stream.

On a side note, the vitamin D3 in supplements is not the same vitamin D3 as what you get from the sun and should not be considered an adequate substitute.

Sunlight exposed skin also produces large amounts of cholesterol sulfate.  

The sun, then, has the potential to provide sulphur to the body in the form of vitamin D3 sulfate and cholesterol sulfate.

Make Sure You Get Enough to Avoid Sulphur Deficiency!

Even though sulphur is basically ignored in nutritional circles, it is nonetheless a critical nutrient and one that is necessary for vibrant health and prevention of chronic disease.  One simple way you can make sure you get sufficient amounts is by getting frequent, nonburning doses of midday sunlight with no sunscreen.

Secondly, eat more eggs!   While many plant foods such as onions, garlic, and cabbage contain sulphur, it is likely the sulphur amounts are low unless the plants are grown in sulphur rich soil.

Unless your produce comes from Iceland, relying on eggs for adequate sulphur is the decidedly better way to go!

 

Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

Sources and More Information

Sulfur Deficiency: A Possible Contributing Factor in Obesity, Heart Disease, Alzheirmer’s and Chronic Fatigue

Vitamin D Deficiency Symptoms Most People Miss

Picture Credit

Comments (168)

  • Samuel Hall

    Where can i order this Sulphur?

    June 17th, 2016 11:33 pm Reply
  • Pauline

    I used to be able to get a little yellow sulfur dog to put in my dogs water. Are these still available?

    November 21st, 2015 5:58 pm Reply
  • Kathryn

    In response to Sarah’s comment “On a side note, the vitamin D3 in supplements is not the same vitamin D3 as what you get from the sun and should not be considered an adequate substitute.” This is not correct. It’s vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) that is synthetic.
    Vitamin D metabolism
    Cholecalciferol and ergocalciferol are biologically inactive precursors of vitamin D and must be converted to biologically active forms in the liver and kidneys. Indeed, following dietary intake or synthesis in the epidermis of skin after UVB exposure, both forms of vitamin D enter the circulation and are transported to the liver by the vitamin D-binding protein (and to a lesser extent by albumin). In hepatocytes (liver cells), vitamin D is hydroxylated to form 25-hydroxyvitamin D (calcidiol; calcifediol). Exposure to sunlight or dietary intake of vitamin D increases serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. 25-hydroxyvitamin D constitutes the major circulating form of vitamin D, and the sum of 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels in serum is used as an indicator of vitamin D nutritional status (3). The renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase enzyme (also known as CYP27B1) eventually catalyzes a second hydroxylation that converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol). The production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidneys is regulated by several factors, including serum phosphorus, calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D itself. While the kidney is the main source of 1α-hydroxylase activity, extra-renal production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D has also been demonstrated in a variety of tissues, including skin, parathyroid gland, breast, colon, prostate, as well as cells of the immune system and bone cells (2). Most of the physiological effects of vitamin D in the body are related to the activity of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D
    Forms of Vitamin D. vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) present in plants; vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) present in the skin of animals; vitamin D3 is converted 25-hydroxyvitamin D (calcidiol) in the liver and then converted to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol) in the kidneys.

    July 12th, 2015 10:49 am Reply
    • Sarah TheHealthyHomeEconomist

      You are misquoting what I wrote. I didn’t say the D3 is supplements was necessarily synthetic … it’s just not the same vitamin D as what you get from the sun (Vitamin D sulfate which is water soluble and travels freely in the blood .. MUCH more effective than the IMO useless and possibly very dangerous vitamin D3 supplements). And .. there are natural D2 sources by the way. Fermented cod liver oil has quite a bit (contact Dave Wetzel of Green Pasture Products for more info on this).

      July 12th, 2015 11:41 am Reply
    • mike

      theres a bit of vitamin d3 that is synthetic as well.. if it comes out of a bottle its basically synthetic.

      theres hundreds and hundreds of different types of vitamin d. I wouldnt limit my inclusion of vitamins by taking one particular molecule synthetically made in a factory.

      August 3rd, 2015 10:44 am Reply
  • Jo Ann Zavala

    I have 4 grandchildren who suffer from eczema and nothing works on it. My husband bought a 50 lb. bag of Sulfur dust 98%. His 94 year old father used it to cure his eczema. we thought it can be mixed with coconut oil so as to rub it on. Does anyone know of its safety in this way? I am tired of seeing my 2 year old granddaughter in the ER because of her eczema. the last time, she was hospitalized for 5 days due to infection. Please help!
    mewantawin@yahoo.com

    March 16th, 2015 3:18 pm Reply
    • Amy

      I’m surprised you haven’t received a response yet. I have psoriasis and in my experience, applying anything to the skin is simply treating the symptoms and not addressing the cause. You need to have her ingest it. There is lots of information about that on the internet.

      April 12th, 2015 3:45 am Reply
    • Bat Sheva

      What I did, was to balance my daughter’s immune system, it eliminated her eczema, it was not as bad as you describe it though. But I am interested in the Organic sulfur crystals for heavy metal detoxing.

      July 6th, 2015 12:35 am Reply
    • Jennifer

      Eczema is actually skin mites and mites don’t like sulfur, so yes, it will work.

      May 29th, 2016 9:21 pm Reply
  • Barbara Young

    When I was 6 years old, I was very ill. When I finally was “better”, my grandmother insisted that I wear a small cotton bag of sulphur around my neck to ward off any infectious diseases.

    I didn’t like it and asked my mother if I could take it off and she told me that it wouldn’t hurt me so keep wearing it.:} I think she didn’t want to encourage a few words about it with her mother-in-law.:}

    My grandmother was of old Yankee stock and used a word identifying the bag with sulpher in it. I was young and was’;t much interested in the stuff hanging around my neck and don’t recall what she called it.

    To my ear, it was strange sounding and all I can remember (I think I do) is that it may have begun with an “a’, fairly long word and now, as an adult all I can think of is that it may have had a Greek, Italian, French sound sound to it. I know that years ago, I saw the word in print but I was still in my not caring years.

    Any help with the identifying of the word would be most appreciated.
    Thank you
    Barbara
    bayofcc@comcast.net

    February 10th, 2015 3:21 pm Reply
    • ChrisTea

      It seems that the Indian spice, asafetida, could be what your grandmother used. It has a strong sulfurous odor that mellows when cooked. There is lots of interesting information about it’s usage available.

      March 25th, 2015 11:28 pm Reply
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  • Matthew

    “Without adequate sulphur, glucose metabolism becomes defective and muscle and fat cells are damaged as the result of becoming glucose intolerant.”

    “This impaired glucose metabolism resulting from insufficient sulphur is also implicated as a factor in obesity and the dangerous condition known as Metabolic Syndrome because one way the body compensates for defective glucose metabolism is by gaining weight.”

    Can you say how sulfur intake affects glucose in the body?

    April 1st, 2014 8:57 am Reply
  • Angi

    what do you do if you’re allergic to eggs!?

    December 21st, 2013 5:34 pm Reply
  • Tilly

    You recognize so tremendously in relation to that theme, made me in my opinion think it is from a lot of several angles. It has the just like males and females will not be serious right up until it is something to complete by using Girl coo! Your very own stuffs excellent. All the time maintain it!

    November 15th, 2013 8:00 pm Reply
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  • zubair ahmed

    My doughter has leukoderma(white pach in two fingers) does sulphar powder helps ? Please reply me if anyone have the right answer

    October 22nd, 2013 11:23 am Reply
  • Mick

    This is where I first learned about the importance of sulfur in the body, and I’ve been taking it twice a day ever since: http://oneradionetwork.com/health-articles/pure-organic-sulfur/

    October 12th, 2013 12:51 pm Reply
  • Yossif

    Another excellent source of Sulfur is Kefir. You get all those amazing vitamins and nutrients as well as a powerful dose of probiotics. I love to let mine go longer and make it more sour to increase the sulfur content. Makes it taste better too!

    July 12th, 2013 12:11 pm Reply
    • greg

      Yossif, I just started making water kefir. My current batch has a slight sulfur smell. Is it ok for me to drink this or should I dump it out and start over? Thanks!

      July 18th, 2014 10:43 am Reply
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  • Daniel

    Mustard greens are rich in sulphur. Dried marigold flowers (you can make a tea) is very, very rich in sulphur. Make sure you aren’t allergic first. All foods containing Methionine will be rich in natural sulphur so egg whites, sesame seed flour etc. are good sources. The best source is wild Atlantic cod fish of which there isn’t too much of anymore, sadly. Black eyed peas are a moderate source of methionine.

    March 13th, 2013 4:58 am Reply
  • Marianne Volgenau via Facebook

    interesting

    February 6th, 2013 12:09 pm Reply
  • Christina McKinley Snover via Facebook

    Anita Machado I buy large tubs of Member’s Mark Epsom Salts (Magnesium Sulfate granules) at Sams Club. Very affordable there.

    February 6th, 2013 12:07 pm Reply
  • Amanda Knight via Facebook

    what is msm? and where can I find it?

    February 6th, 2013 9:57 am Reply
    • Ms. Free

      MSM or Methysulfonylmethane (we promise you that this is not a narcotic) in short, is a form of sulfur that can be found in everything from plants to animals. MSM has been used to treat many symptoms from hair loss to snoring to joint discomfort.

      March 23rd, 2015 4:09 am Reply
  • Karen Tough via Facebook

    we give our horses sulphur – outstanding results – take msm myself now lol

    February 6th, 2013 5:45 am Reply
  • Karen Wojciechowski Larsen via Facebook

    I have to say I’ve noticed a huge difference in my health this year since I starting taking MSM last April, this article on sulfur is so interesting!

    February 6th, 2013 2:40 am Reply
  • Saturnina Pediten Victoriano via Facebook

    we need that sun… it is always raining and cloudy most of the day. I take D3 and calcium but yeh… its synthetic.

    February 6th, 2013 1:16 am Reply
  • Lena Lynch via Facebook

    As far as I have researched the only supplement source for sulfur is MSM!

    MSM is an incredible supplement which causes wonderful healing in peoples bodies, I have been using it for many years, it can take a person in pain from arthritis or carpel tunnel to almost pain free and flexible in only a few weeks, if they take 1/2-upto 1 TBS a couple times a day in water!

    IN fact it has long been used for very expensive racehorses for it ability to heal and reduce pain and inflammation!

    There is only really one or two manufactures even though you will find it under a bunch of different labels, and it comes from wood pulp, when they see the liquid coming off wood pulp it is DMSO (used topically as a spray for pain) when it drys and crystallizes they have MSM crystals!
    Since sulfur is normally lost in the evaporation of foods and herbs ect. there has never before been a way to capture the sulfur to make a supplement, it just dissipates as it where!

    You should be getting plenty of natural sulfur in your raw fruits and vegetables, but since most have now sat in the store and where picked long ago they end up being very low in sulfur, if there is any at all!

    Try some today, even your hair will become thicker, shinny and silky in only a few weeks of you using 1/2 TBS 1 time a day in water!
    For people with eye troubles, cataracts and vision problems I can post some info about its healing effects on the eyes when made into eye drops too!

    February 5th, 2013 11:35 pm Reply
    • Bronwyn Gwilliam

      i have been taking sulphur for about 2 yrs as i have fibromyalgia for past 3 yrs. It is good but dont think i am taking enough… will up it from the 2 teaspoons a day i have been havimg. how do i take it to improve my vision?

      February 4th, 2015 5:09 am Reply
  • Anita Machado via Facebook

    Wow good info & comments too! Anyone recommend on what brand of Epson salts?

    February 5th, 2013 10:59 pm Reply
  • Melaney Medley Strickland via Facebook

    Sulphur soap works for acne and rashes. It’s really cheap too.

    February 5th, 2013 7:23 pm Reply
  • Melissa Luxmooe

    Hi Sarah
    I’m just wondering about something you have said in this post ….”The sun, then, has the potential to provide sulphur to the body in the form of vitamin D3 sulfate and cholesterol sulfate.”

    Do have a reference for this? I’m not sure that it is 100% correct. I’m thinking that the sun encourages the binding of D3 to sulfate in the body, rather than the sun actually supplying sulfate to the body. I’m not 100% sure either but if you have a reference, I would love to read it.
    Melissa

    February 5th, 2013 6:05 pm Reply
  • Marie Gagnon via Facebook

    Here’s a great interview with Stephanie Seneff from Dr. Mercola. It’s a 7 part video. You can start by part1 : http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&list=PLD1A6CE7E947EF510&v=5QUChSlUEH0

    February 5th, 2013 4:12 pm Reply
  • Lorraine Bergen Drake via Facebook

    I like the sulphur hot springs you float in it.but sure stinks.also nice and warm in the winter

    February 5th, 2013 3:34 pm Reply
  • Janet Bennett

    My goodness, I certainly need to take time to proof messages – I do know how to spell “two”. and I do know how to punctuate. Hard to tell from this post.

    February 5th, 2013 3:30 pm Reply
  • Janet Bennett

    In the old days we always heard about how kids were routinely given sulphur and molases in the spring as a tonic. The first of the “miracle drugs” came into play during WWII, the first ones were the Sulfa drugs, sprinkled on battle wounds. The names I heard were sulfathiazole and sulfadiazene. There was another too. We heard of these before penicillin became more popular. My father was given sulfa drugs duringt least one of his surgeries in the 40’s. My kids were also given sulfa for ordinary stuff – don’t remember if that was mainly for colds or stomach bugs or what. In any case, I think sulfa and sulphur are too different things but we were always kind of confused about them. I bring this up because of one of the earlier posts here that mentions WWII and wonder whether the writer’s mother might actually have been given sulfa and not sulphur.

    February 5th, 2013 3:28 pm Reply
  • Kelly Kindig via Facebook

    My dh used it to try and quit smoking and it was very helpful with the mood swings and cravings.
    Ultimately he preferes to smoke rather than not. :(

    February 5th, 2013 3:06 pm Reply
  • Lauralee Lien via Facebook

    I am also allergic to sulfur ( what the allergy tests confirmed) and my son is like Jen ^ above- he broke out like the measles when he was little from Sulfa based drugs.

    February 5th, 2013 2:57 pm Reply
  • Sara James via Facebook

    Everyone is jumping in the tub now! Whee!!! 😉 how much Epsom salt does everyone use and any specific brands? We eat a lot of eggs too.

    February 5th, 2013 2:52 pm Reply
  • Jen Duran via Facebook

    I am allergic to sulfa drugs and also seem to have a sensitivity to high sulphur foods. If I have Chlorella, I will get a terrible full body rash within a few days — the same reaction I get from Sulfa drugs. Is this just a coincidence or maybe I am allergic to something else in Chlorella…?

    February 5th, 2013 2:41 pm Reply
  • Kathryn Zochert Berg via Facebook

    This is really interesting. A lot of the diseases adequate sulphur prevents are also diseases cured by homeopathic sulphur.

    February 5th, 2013 2:34 pm Reply
  • Rene Whitehurst via Facebook

    Be sure to look at where your epsom salts are from! Most cheap varieties are from China.

    February 5th, 2013 2:18 pm Reply
  • Thora Pomicter via Facebook

    I have just started taking organic sulfur crystals after doing some research from the Weston Price Foundation on it, mostly to help to heal my very dry, cracked skin in wintertime. I am discovering the amazing health benefits of these sulfur crystals. I would suggest checking out Weston Price info on it if you are curious. They have a wealth of information!

    February 5th, 2013 1:46 pm Reply
  • Amanda Waddell via Facebook

    I am curious is a lack of sulphur is related to tinea versicolor, a skin condition? I have heard that epsom salt baths can help treat it, so I’ve been doing that, but it’s hard to find specific (holistic) information on how to treat and prevent it for good, so any input is helpful!

    February 5th, 2013 1:33 pm Reply
  • Amanda Earthmothergypsy via Facebook

    I would also like to know the amount of epsom salts you use in your bath or is there a best amount? How about best brand to use? Recommended number of baths per week with it in?

    February 5th, 2013 1:26 pm Reply
  • Andrea James via Facebook

    thehealthyhomeeconomist, what are your thoughts on MSM?

    February 5th, 2013 12:55 pm Reply
  • Denver Tina via Facebook

    Tonya Scarborough – Thanks for the link to that salt!

    February 5th, 2013 12:39 pm Reply
  • Pamela Duff via Facebook

    I have a farmer friend who grows garlic. She said that back during one of the plagues, the prisoners who had been fed garlic (because the general public didn’t want it(?) or it was cheap or something) were the ones who were able to do clean up and bury the bodies without being infected.

    February 5th, 2013 12:37 pm Reply
  • Tonya Scarborough via Facebook

    Indian black salt. http://www.saltworks.us/kala-namak-black-salt.html

    February 5th, 2013 12:31 pm Reply
  • Kathy Pilarcik Deutsch via Facebook

    my mom, who is now 82 and still runs a farm, drank sulphur-laden well water on her way to school as a kid. My health drastically improved when I started eating eggs every day. Now, my chickens supply our family’s eggs. I cannot say this too strongly, a couple hens are the cheapest way to increase your health.

    February 5th, 2013 12:25 pm Reply
  • Denver Tina via Facebook

    My water has chloramines in it so I’d rather not soak it it. What are other souces of sulfur?

    February 5th, 2013 12:19 pm Reply
  • Lisa Beyer via Facebook

    Yes, it depends on strength of the product the actual numbers. I sell dairy products, the magnesium sulfate I carry has more sulfur in it than magnesium. All products will have a guaranteed analysis on the back as well as ingredient listing. If you ever wonder if there is sulfur in a product look at the ingredient listing. You don’t need to look for sulfur by itself in the listing, look for it behind another term. Such as in a vitamin supplement, you will see “zinc sulfate, manganese sulfate, cobalt sulfate”. You will get more bioavailable sulfur from a compound such as those than you will from element sulfur. Hope that helps!

    February 5th, 2013 12:17 pm Reply
  • Brenda Markham via Facebook

    I take an MSM supplement daily. As a child my mom would give us sulphur tablets. I loved them! They had a tangy-creamy flavor. Can’t find them anymore.

    February 5th, 2013 12:15 pm Reply
  • Terry Esselstyn via Facebook

    There is sulphur in epson salts as well as magnesium?

    February 5th, 2013 12:13 pm Reply
  • Ashley Rozenberg via Facebook

    People keep saying that but once the magnesium mixes with water it breaks down in to ions… so either way you are getting magnesium ions which would absorb equally. The only person I see saying that mag chloride is better than epsom salt is the guy selling the over priced flakes. Epsom salts were good enough for my great grandmother who lived in to her 90’s. They were good enough for the people of Britian in the 17th century who flocked to the epsom spa for week long rejuvenating soaks.

    February 5th, 2013 12:13 pm Reply
  • Lyndsey Stark Stang via Facebook

    From the smell of my well water, I think I get enough sulfur. Lol

    February 5th, 2013 12:12 pm Reply
  • Angie Stimac Sallows via Facebook

    I buy it in cell salts.

    February 5th, 2013 12:11 pm Reply
  • Dana Moore via Facebook

    Our water had sulphur! (We get it fresh from a spring) it smells a bit when we first fill up but it quickly goes away and you can’t taste it or smell it.

    February 5th, 2013 12:11 pm Reply
  • Jasmine L. Jafferali-Whitehead via Facebook

    We do both, flakes once a week, salts the other days of the week.

    February 5th, 2013 12:11 pm Reply
  • Mandy Lancaster via Facebook

    Love my garlic, onions, lacto-fermented foods and eggs from my sweet chickens!

    February 5th, 2013 12:09 pm Reply
  • thehealthyhomeeconomist via Facebook

    Epsom salts is magnesium sulfate. Magnesium flakes are magnesium chloride. You won’t get any sulfur soaking in magnesium flakes.

    February 5th, 2013 12:08 pm Reply
  • Ashley Rozenberg via Facebook

    We do plenty of eggs and epsom salt

    February 5th, 2013 12:08 pm Reply
  • thehealthyhomeeconomist via Facebook

    Jasmine L. Jafferali-Whitehead Yes, magnesium flakes are better for magnesium, but they have no sulfur in them. If you want sulfur, you need to soak in epsom salts.

    February 5th, 2013 12:06 pm Reply
  • Matt Marie McClanahan via Facebook

    Great info. We are so glad to be getting local eggs, YUM and full of sulfur!

    February 5th, 2013 12:06 pm Reply
  • Lisa Beyer via Facebook

    I’m not a nutritionist, but we have a mineral and vitamin company which blends supplements for dairy cattle. I sell very little elemental sulfur, it is not bioavailable. Dairy nutritionist obtain sulfur levels from other compounds, such as getting the sulfur from Zinc Sulfate.

    February 5th, 2013 12:05 pm Reply
  • Jasmine L. Jafferali-Whitehead via Facebook

    Unfortunately, he cannot have eggs and have been told to limit or avoid peppers, onions and garlic, though it is hard to not cook with them. I’ve read that Magnesium Flakes are higher in Mg than Espom Salts and a different type of Mg that is absorbs better than the salts.

    February 5th, 2013 12:04 pm Reply
  • Brittani Crawford via Facebook

    Wow I have never heard that sulphur was important at all! We do eat farm fresh eggs a lot but I am going to start using Epsom salt in my kids baths as well. I learn so much from your posts and articles. Thank you!

    February 5th, 2013 12:04 pm Reply
  • Maurice Douglas via Facebook

    thehealthyhomeeconomist how often do you take epson salt baths? Or how often do you recommend?
    I thought Epson salt was loaded with magnesium?

    February 5th, 2013 12:02 pm Reply
  • Andrea James via Facebook

    What are your thoughts on MSM?

    February 5th, 2013 12:01 pm Reply
  • Louise

    I’m surprised to see ads for processed and fast foods on your blog!

    February 5th, 2013 12:01 pm Reply
  • thehealthyhomeeconomist via Facebook

    Note that garlic, onions and cabbage have sulphur only if the soil they grew in have it … and if it’s not volcanic soil, probably not that much.

    February 5th, 2013 12:00 pm Reply
  • Jasmine L. Jafferali-Whitehead via Facebook

    I’ve been reading up on this and linking the connection with a lack of sulphur in my son’s diet to his sensory processing disorder. I began giving him homeopathics of sulphur once a week and recommended by a doctor. He gets Espom Salt baths at least 3-4 times per week or Mag flake baths. He also has psoriasis which is slowly getting better (as I refuse steriod cream)

    February 5th, 2013 12:00 pm Reply
  • Heather Weinstock via Facebook

    Garlic also has lots of sulfur.

    February 5th, 2013 11:58 am Reply
  • thehealthyhomeeconomist via Facebook

    Sulphur absorbs really well through the skin.

    February 5th, 2013 11:57 am Reply
  • thehealthyhomeeconomist via Facebook

    I take epsom salt baths to make sure I get enough sulphur. Such a critical nutrient.

    February 5th, 2013 11:57 am Reply
  • Jennifer Edlund via Facebook

    Interesting

    February 5th, 2013 11:55 am Reply
  • Diane Schmid Laverty via Facebook

    Sulfur, Sulfites, and Sulfate, Allergy are not Sulfa Allergies

    The words may sound alike but this doesn’t mean they are the same nor that there are cross-reactivities to allergens. Below is a brief description of distinctions.

    Sulfur is a chemical compound found in drugs and cosmeceuticals and preservatives. It is not the same as sulfa drug allergy.
    Sulfites are preservatives. Some people experience respiratory problems when eating food with sulfites, bisulfites, or metabisulfites. Some wine headaches are from sulfites in red wines. Check labels if allergic.
    Sulfates are salts. They are used in some drug compounds. This is not the same as sulfa drug allergy although one can be allergic to sulfates.

    Read more at Suite101: What is a Real Sulfa Drug Allergic Reaction? | Suite101 http://suite101.com/article/what-is-a-sulfa-drug-allergic-reaction-a228000#ixzz2K2aGRAnG
    Follow us: @suite101 on Twitter | Suite101 on Facebook

    February 5th, 2013 11:53 am Reply
  • Diane Schmid Laverty via Facebook

    http://suite101.com/article/what-is-a-sulfa-drug-allergic-reaction-a228000

    February 5th, 2013 11:52 am Reply
  • thehealthyhomeeconomist via Facebook

    Mary Anne Gibson Eggs are loaded with sulphur … I don’t really think you can compare a drug to a nutrient. You definitely have sulphur in your body :)

    February 5th, 2013 11:52 am Reply
  • Mary Anne Gibson via Facebook

    is sulphur and sulfa drugs related? I am allergic to sulfa drugs.

    February 5th, 2013 11:47 am Reply
  • Mariana Evica via Facebook

    (Not the only way to get it :))

    February 5th, 2013 11:46 am Reply
  • Mariana Evica via Facebook

    I use Hing frequently!

    February 5th, 2013 11:46 am Reply
  • Jen

    Dr. Terry Whals also points out the value of sulphur in her talk on brain health. This is a woman who dramatically improved her health–put MS into remission–with a change of diet: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLjgBLwH3Wc

    March 26th, 2012 6:40 am Reply
  • Jen

    I crave sulphur-rich greens (cooked!) and onions (raw!). There’s a meal that’s known in southern Appalachian as “poor man’s supper”: pintos and greens cooked with pork of some kind and cornbread with raw onion and relishes on the side. I’ve always loved how it sits with me.

    March 25th, 2012 3:47 pm Reply
  • Jackie

    I never thought about Egg’s helping with Memory & got me thinking on why my Grandmother(93yrs.) & my Dad(81yrs) did’nt have memory problem’s hardly at all, They had egg’s every single day while i was growing up, My Dad made toast & egg’s for me & 6 sibling’s every morning with out fail. Once married i stopped except for a fried egg sandwich occasionally, tho i love them. I really don’t at 57yrs, have much of a memory loss or my sibling’s, like so many we know. my kid’s would not eat egg’s even tho i cooked them every single day just in case until my DD was a senior in school, she has a really bad memory & i worry. I am going to be adding egg’s back as much as possible now . We also have extreme sulfer water never thought that could be a good thing. Thank You for the great info on this.

    September 19th, 2011 3:19 pm Reply
  • Jill Phillips

    I live in CO and it’s going to be winter here pretty soon and will be too cold to lay out in the sun and I can’t stay out in the sun anyway like I could when I was younger. The hot sun makes me have hot flashes! Also I can’t eat eggs, they give me a migraine. There’s nothing else that you can eat that will give you enough sulphur except for the sun and eggs?

    September 18th, 2011 5:32 am Reply
    • Beth

      Your migraines from eggs might be due to soy feed for the chickens. Try soy-free, pasture-raised eggs to see if it makes a difference.

      April 2nd, 2012 5:59 am Reply
  • Cindy Townes Ritchey via Facebook

    Darn it….I’m allergic.

    September 16th, 2011 11:11 am Reply
    • Janell

      You are not allergic to sulfur. Our bodies NEED sulfur, and our innate intelligence would never make you be allergic to an essential mineral. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/69144.php

      September 30th, 2013 3:26 pm Reply
      • Laura

        It is VERY possible to be allergic to sulfur. I have multiple genetic mutations that make sulfur build up in my system – I have to be careful and r
        Eat a low sulfur diet and not take any supplemental sulfur. It’s mutations of the CBS gene and BHMT gene.

        January 29th, 2014 4:53 pm Reply
  • Mike

    I have enjoyed the results taking sulfur for a while. I get my organic sulfur crystals from http://www.healthtalkhawaii.com

    September 15th, 2011 12:20 am Reply
  • Sheila S

    Hi Sarah, I’ve been watching some of your videos and have learned how to make Kombucha, water kefir, and milk kefir, along with some of your yummy recipes! Thank you for doing this! My husband found this article today and I thought you might be interested. It cites a study done in the UK…Raw Milk helps kids not get asthma/allergies. It’s from Reuters. http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/13/us-kids-raw-milk-idUSTRE78C75O20110913 It was posted yesterday.

    Thank you, again, for the yummy recipes!

    September 14th, 2011 8:22 pm Reply
  • Teoma

    Eidon is a great source for sulphur. They carry a wide range of angstrom minerals. ihealthtree is the most inexpensive place I have found them.

    September 14th, 2011 2:28 pm Reply
    • Kathy

      Hi Teoma, I buy my angstrom minerals at Mineralifeonline.com or Kornax.com

      Just wanted to let you know that Kornax is much less expensive then what you are currently buying. Kornax (Sulfur 32oz Super Strength 6,000ppm Angstrom $31.25) is $5.42 per 1,000 mg while the Sulfur (19 Oz From Eidon Ionic Minerals for $13.79) is $24.19 per 1,000 mg. The Kornax is more concentrated so you could just take smaller doses to equal what you currently take.

      September 16th, 2011 2:38 am Reply
  • Darcy

    In our area, often a “rotten egg” smell in the water is an indicate of high iron or “rusty water.” (Iron is good for you too. :-) ) They’d know if it was iron if they also had reddish stains in the sinks and toilets.

    September 14th, 2011 1:49 pm Reply
    • Janelle

      Why do you think iron is good for you? Too much of this metal and you will age a lot faster! http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/iron-dangers.shtml
      Some people are even told to filter their well water because it contains too much of certain metals or other contaminants.

      September 14th, 2011 6:23 pm Reply
  • tracy

    And the way they get “sweet” onions (maui, texas 1051, vidalia) is partly by growing them in places with low-sulfur soil! Hmm….

    September 14th, 2011 1:35 pm Reply
  • isa

    Sarah, I’m wondering what you think of MSN in powder form.

    September 14th, 2011 1:27 pm Reply
    • Sarah, TheHealthyHomeEconomist

      Hi Isa, I don’t take MSM and prefer to get my sulphur from food and sun. Not to say that it might not be good to take temporarily if need be but I’m not in favor of just taking it long term for no specific therapeutic reason.

      September 14th, 2011 2:11 pm Reply
    • Jennie

      Hi isa, when I was reading up on MSM after learning of the health benefits of sulphur, I found out that when it’s processed into powder from the crystals, it loses around 80% of it’s effectiveness, so get crystals rather than the powder.

      September 14th, 2011 11:14 pm Reply
  • Carmen Roa

    There is a Mexican-owned Herb company that sells Sulphur powder. I can’t recall the name of the company and I repackage my herbs into glass as soon as I get them home, so I don’t have the pakcage at hand.
    The Sulphur I bought came in a little cellophane package. You can find these herbs usually in the Latino foods section of the store. If the store has the other herbs there but no Sulphur powder, you can ask the manager to stock it.

    September 14th, 2011 1:17 pm Reply
  • Tina

    Justyn – what brand do you take?

    September 14th, 2011 1:03 pm Reply
  • Fran Kozicki via Facebook

    Just started taking mine again.

    September 14th, 2011 12:40 pm Reply
  • Justyn

    Thanks for the great info! I had no idea sulfur was a good thing! I’m curious about dried fruit with sulfur. I know that it is used to keep the fruit from browning, but is this the same type of sulfur that you’re referring to? I wondered because health-food stores often sell “unsulfured” dried fruit as a healthier alternative…

    September 14th, 2011 12:39 pm Reply
    • Sarah, TheHealthyHomeEconomist

      That type of sulfur added to dried fruit it is best to avoid from what I can remember as it is a kind of preservative or color enhancer, can’t remember which.

      September 14th, 2011 1:15 pm Reply
    • Heidi Chick

      Hey Justyn, the stuff manufacturers use on dried fruit is sulphur dioxide for the preservitive qualities and gives a lot of people tummy trouble, it’s not good and is not the stuff being discussed here. Hope that helps

      January 25th, 2014 11:59 pm Reply
  • D.

    What the eggs have in them for sulphur content will vary greatly depending on the chicken’s main diet. Pasture fed chickens would always vary because they are getting a variety of weeds and grasses, as a rule. MSM is a great supplemental way for humans to get sulphur, don’t know how well it would go over in chicken feed or sprinkled onto their pasture area though. It’s mighty stinky in its base form, but the MSM doesn’t smell. I added mine to smoothies, along with magnesium chloride and dolomite.

    September 14th, 2011 12:34 pm Reply
  • Kelsey

    Does cooking the eggs damage the sulfur content at all?

    September 14th, 2011 12:16 pm Reply
    • Sarah, TheHealthyHomeEconomist

      Not that I am aware of Kelsey.

      September 14th, 2011 12:27 pm Reply
  • AmandaZ

    Make that reason number eight-million why farm-fresh, pastured eggs are my favorite food.

    September 14th, 2011 12:10 pm Reply
  • Raquel

    So sulphur is good for treating yeast infections too?

    September 14th, 2011 12:06 pm Reply
  • Jami Delgado via Facebook

    Surprised no one has mentioned how awesome sulphur is for your hair. Many people wash their hair with yeast infection creams for
    The sulphur and get crazy hair growth. Adding some of the sulphur powder to your fav shampoo will do wonders for growth.

    September 14th, 2011 11:44 am Reply
    • Ariel

      Wow, that’s really interesting… I wonder why it does that?

      Anyway, I’ve had fabulous experiences with sulpher. I had been trying to loose weight for a while, and the only thing that worked at first was eating copious ammounts of coconut oil (we’re talking a minimum of a 1/4 cup a day), but progress, though steady, was slow. However, when I began eating the coconut oil in conjunction with lots of supher-rich foods, like raw egg yolks in my smoothie, lots of grassfed beef, and well water (and yes, it’s quite smelly), the weight just fell off!

      September 14th, 2011 12:10 pm Reply
    • D.

      How on earth do you wash your hair with vaginal creams? Are you talking about creams like Gyne-Lotrimin or Nystatin or Monistat??

      September 14th, 2011 12:37 pm Reply
  • Jami Delgado via Facebook

    Surprised no one has mentioned how awesome sulphur is for your hair. Many people wash their hair with yeast infection creams for
    The sulphur and get crazy hair growth. Adding some of the sulphur powder to your fav shampoo will do wonders for growth.

    September 14th, 2011 11:44 am Reply
  • drdahahn (@drdahahn)

    Sulphur: The Forgotten Nutrient – The Healthy Home Economist http://t.co/OHtgYBu

    September 14th, 2011 11:37 am Reply
  • Laurie Neverman (@CommonSenseIdea) (@CommonSenseIdea)

    Interesting post on #sulfur from thehealthyhomeeconomist http://t.co/NlA6jH9

    September 14th, 2011 11:33 am Reply
  • Annette K. Scott

    Once again a great article! Thank you so much Sarah for all the sharing and caring that you do!

    September 14th, 2011 11:33 am Reply
  • Sarah, TheHealthyHomeEconomist

    Hi Kristen, I wouldn’t rely on this. Eggs or the sun would be best. Red meat is also high in sulfur containing amino acids.

    September 14th, 2011 11:17 am Reply
  • Kristen

    Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate. Are epsom salt soaks a good way to increase sulphur? Especially in winter when sun is hiding and chickens are not laying as much…

    September 14th, 2011 11:09 am Reply
  • Tina Loving via Facebook

    Peggy – I use Our Kids Zinc Sulfate cream. It’s casein free, soy free, corn free, gluten free. Not sure any of that matters to you but it seems to be a good product; it’s a bit pricey though.

    September 14th, 2011 11:06 am Reply
  • Tina Loving via Facebook

    Peggy – I use Our Kids Zinc Sulfate cream. It’s casein free, soy free, corn free, gluten free. Not sure any of that matters to you but it seems to be a good product; it’s a bit pricey though.

    September 14th, 2011 11:06 am Reply
  • Teresa

    I wonder–app how many free range eggs it would take to get sufficient dose of sulfur. Maybe the sun exposure and eggs would do it.
    How would you treatment infections with sulfur? Anyone know. I have a dog that i just cant afford to keep taking to the dr for antibiotics. I think his anal glands keep getting infected.

    September 14th, 2011 11:06 am Reply
    • D.

      When you take your dog in to be groomed, ask the groomer to evacuate the anal glands. Normally they will do this as a matter of course, but not all of them do. I think just putting some in your dog’s water or sprinkling it on his food would be a good way, because it will work from the inside out, as well as an external application would. It would be pretty hard to put gauze pad packs on a dog’s butt! Just sayin’.

      September 14th, 2011 12:22 pm Reply
      • D.

        I should clarify a little about the anal gland thing – we have a cocker, who naturally has a bobbed-tail. The person we bought him from docked it a tad too short though, and now there is really nothing there to wag, so the groomer told us when a dog can’t wag it’s tail properly, the anal glands won’t evacuate on their own. That’s why they usually do it manually, especially for a dog with a bobbed-tail. Get your dog excited and maybe he’ll get that tail wagging, unless you have the same situation we do.

        Also, make sure your dog is getting enough iodine. Very important for dogs. We use white iodine which we order online or pick up from a local alternative medicine place. Made by Progressive Labs.

        Putting just a dash of unrefined, natural celtic sea salt in your dog’s water bowl helps with those trace minerals, too.

        September 14th, 2011 12:27 pm Reply
      • Renee N.

        I just wanted to share another view on the anal gland issue. This is a very informative video on the subject: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yA9SeHAEyQ4

        September 15th, 2011 12:39 am Reply
  • Jerra Wheeler via Facebook

    Is there a safe way of extracting it from the Earth? It is a VERY grueling job for the men who go into active volcanoes and chip out the sulphur, carry 200lbs. of it on their shoulders/back, and have to stop working in their 30s due to the damage the toxic gases released during the extracting process do to their lungs. Very sad but it is a very profitable job for these men and their families. Obviously they have a choice to do this or not, just wanting to know if there is an easier way to get it to use it for it’s wonderful properties.

    September 14th, 2011 11:03 am Reply
  • Jerra Wheeler via Facebook

    Is there a safe way of extracting it from the Earth? It is a VERY grueling job for the men who go into active volcanoes and chip out the sulphur, carry 200lbs. of it on their shoulders/back, and have to stop working in their 30s due to the damage the toxic gases released during the extracting process do to their lungs. Very sad but it is a very profitable job for these men and their families. Obviously they have a choice to do this or not, just wanting to know if there is an easier way to get it to use it for it’s wonderful properties.

    September 14th, 2011 11:03 am Reply
  • Tina Loving via Facebook

    Thanks, Catherine – that was helpful.

    September 14th, 2011 11:01 am Reply
  • Tina Loving via Facebook

    Thanks, Catherine – that was helpful.

    September 14th, 2011 11:01 am Reply
  • The Economics Smiley (@TheEconSmiley) (@TheEconSmiley)

    Sulphur: The Forgotten Nutrient – The Healthy Home Economist http://t.co/fNr5gnm #sulphur #Icel… http://t.co/4JpqvpY #economics #econ

    September 14th, 2011 11:00 am Reply
  • Peggy Mills via Facebook

    @Dawn, where can one get a zinc and sulfur cream? i use sulfur homeopathic tabs and that helps my skin breakouts.

    September 14th, 2011 10:55 am Reply
  • Peggy Mills via Facebook

    @Dawn, where can one get a zinc and sulfur cream? i use sulfur homeopathic tabs and that helps my skin breakouts.

    September 14th, 2011 10:55 am Reply
  • Donna Hinote Thompson via Facebook

    My husband’s family owned and ran a small general store in a rural community in the 70’s and 80’s and they always carried powdered sulfur, a very popular remedy. I began taking sulfur a month ago for chronic back pain and it has been a tremendous help. It is widely available in products for joint pain and for building healthy cartilige.

    September 14th, 2011 10:49 am Reply
  • Donna Hinote Thompson via Facebook

    My husband’s family owned and ran a small general store in a rural community in the 70’s and 80’s and they always carried powdered sulfur, a very popular remedy. I began taking sulfur a month ago for chronic back pain and it has been a tremendous help. It is widely available in products for joint pain and for building healthy cartilige.

    September 14th, 2011 10:49 am Reply
  • sara r.

    So how much sulfur is in an average free-range egg, or will that depend upon the locality and diet of the chicken?

    September 14th, 2011 10:40 am Reply
    • Sarah, TheHealthyHomeEconomist

      Chickens that are free to peck for insects and grubs should produce eggs higher in sulphur than chickens eating soy and grains from depleted soils.

      September 14th, 2011 11:20 am Reply
  • marina

    Sulfur is also great for wrinkles, nails and hair!!!
    Personally, I am currently taking MSM powder, which is a great source of sulfur to prepare my body to replace amalgalm fillings. According to Dr. Mercola, it helps with mercury detox. And while I realize MSM is chemically produced, for short term heavy metal detox and other problems it should be fine.

    September 14th, 2011 10:40 am Reply
  • Heather Brandt

    My son is currently sensitive to eggs (hoping to be able to reintroduce them some day). Is sunlight what you recommend? Trying to figure out how much/how to do it b/c he is very fair and easily burns….

    September 14th, 2011 10:40 am Reply
    • Sarah, TheHealthyHomeEconomist

      Hi Heather, red meat is also high in sulphur containing amino acids.

      September 14th, 2011 11:19 am Reply
    • Cassandra

      My 1 year old daughter is also very fair and I’ve had her bare skin in the sun several times now, she’s only burnt a tiny bit one time. The key is to watch for the skin to start turning pink because that is the limit for vitamin D production for the day as well as the brink of burning. It’ll be about 15-20 minutes of direct sun. Granted I’m also in the NW so if you’re further south, it might be shorter.

      September 14th, 2011 11:26 am Reply
  • Catherine Garbus via Facebook

    well tina if you showered or bathed in it it would absorb in the skin

    September 14th, 2011 10:39 am Reply
  • Tina Loving via Facebook

    Is there a good supplement for sulfur? Or maybe a good cream?

    September 14th, 2011 10:39 am Reply
    • marina

      Hi Tina. I found MSM powder to be great. It does have a bitter taste but I am currently taking it for mercury (preparing myself to replace mercury fillings) detox.

      September 14th, 2011 10:52 am Reply
      • Kara

        Marina, your post caught my attention, my husband just had x-rays done today in preparation to have his mercury fillings removed soon. Can you explain more or give me links to this detox you are referring too? We are fairly new to this more aware healthy living and I am still trying to figure it all out :). Thanks!!

        February 5th, 2013 5:02 pm Reply
    • Kathy

      There is also the Angstrom Mineral kind. It is a liquid that is essentially pre-digested into a particle size that fits right into your cell doors. Since it is already broken down it is almost 100% absorbed so you need a smaller dose. I just started using it so was interested to read this article. I bought it becasue I found that I react differently to using mangesium sulfate (epsom salts) in my bath vs. magnesium chloride. So I thought the difference may be that I need more sulfur. Here’s what I’ve been using… http://www.kornax.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=KE&Product_Code=AN-SSL&Category_Code=LIQ

      September 16th, 2011 2:00 am Reply
  • Leesie (@SeasLife) (@SeasLife)

    Sulphur: The Forgotten Nutrient – The Healthy Home Economist http://t.co/pKGSU6q #sulphur #Iceland #health

    September 14th, 2011 10:30 am Reply
  • Kellie Hunt via Facebook

    People used to keep sulfur blocks for the cattle.Milk also used to be a good source till they started pasturizing it.

    September 14th, 2011 10:29 am Reply
    • D.

      I remember mineral blocks and salt blocks, but not sulphur blocks. The mineral blocks were reddish brown in color and the salt blocks were creamy white and sometimes grayish white in color. It depended on where my Dad bought them, I guess, but it was usually from the Farm Co-op Store because that’s about all we had back then. Our turkeys, chickens and guinea hens used to love pecking away at these, too, whenever the cattle were out to pasture and not up by the stock dams where we kept the blocks. I would guess the mineral blocks contained some sulphur, though. The smell of those blocks used to amaze me because they smelled really clean or pure or something – can’t explain it.

      May 31st, 2012 10:19 am Reply
  • Tina Loving via Facebook

    My parents well water smells like rotten eggs and I avoid drinking it (it makes my clothes smell, too.) But now I know it’s a good thing!

    September 14th, 2011 10:24 am Reply
  • Kellie Hunt via Facebook

    Got plenty of eggs here.

    September 14th, 2011 10:21 am Reply
  • Crystal Palmer Bull via Facebook

    i jsut posted yesterday .. maybe the day before on this.

    September 14th, 2011 10:21 am Reply
  • Dawn Mc Laughlin via Facebook

    When any of my clients have skin ailments I remind them of zinc and sulpher creams their Grannies would use!

    September 14th, 2011 10:19 am Reply
    • Chris

      What creams do you recommend? I’m 30 and still struggle with acne(always have mulitple bumps on my face) and have tried soooo many things, and nothing works. I’m using a sulfur soap right now, but haven’t notice a huge difference.

      September 16th, 2011 1:48 pm Reply
      • Beth

        Interestingly, sulphur is considered the “beauty mineral” because it’s great for the skin, hair and nails.

        April 2nd, 2012 5:47 am Reply
  • Dawn T (@CulturedMama) (@CulturedMama)

    Sulphur. It’s good for you. http://t.co/z0kEhwu

    September 14th, 2011 10:17 am Reply
  • Catherine Garbus via Facebook

    before antibiotics it was the one way to treat infection and illness

    September 14th, 2011 10:16 am Reply
    • Pamela

      Sulfur was given to my Mom during WWII when other medical support state-side was in limited availability. Later my mom received a shot that made her really sick.
      I had always been afraid of sulfur because of this story. Though when I heard her retell the story, I realized the issue was that shot. And now I know why she received the sulfur in the first place.

      February 5th, 2013 12:22 pm Reply
  • Michael Dawn Thies via Facebook

    I recommended Sulphur as a natural remedy for a dog’s hot spots the other day, and it was as if I had recommended moon beams and bathing in a silver basin by starlight. lol

    September 14th, 2011 10:16 am Reply
  • Jackie Vickery via Facebook

    My grandmother used sulphur, a yellow powder type!

    September 14th, 2011 10:15 am Reply
  • Catherine Garbus via Facebook

    my dad always always used sulphur in the form of DMSO he carried it with him and swore by it .. now i see people selling it on the internet as a miracle drug

    September 14th, 2011 10:14 am Reply
  • HealthyHomeEconomist (@HealthyHomeEcon) (@HealthyHomeEcon) (@HealthyHomeEcon) (@HealthyHomeEcon) (@HealthyHomeEcon)

    Sulphur: The Forgotten Nutrient – The Healthy Home Economist http://t.co/lTOw3dM

    September 14th, 2011 10:05 am Reply
    • Loraine turos

      I take organic sulfur every day and the arthritis is my hands and wrists is gone. What a blessing.

      February 1st, 2014 8:09 am Reply

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