Commercial Yogurt Won’t Do Squat for Your Health

by Sarah TheHealthyHomeEconomist September 18, 2011

commercial yogurtAs I was standing in line at the grocery store the other day, I noticed an older lady in front of me had an entire cart loaded with commercial yogurt.

I immediately felt very empathetic for her situation as she obviously was placing high importance on commercial yogurt in her diet – perhaps to help some sort of chronic digestive issue.

What is really sad is that it is virtually certain that she was experiencing little to no benefit for her efforts.

This is because standard store yogurt including those squeezable yogurt tubes for kids are not the probiotic filled food that the television commercials and other advertising would lead you to believe.

The problem is that commercial yogurt is fermented for very short periods of time.   The length of time is so short (one person in the dairy industry told me that it is an hour or even less) that thickening agents are sometimes even added to commercial yogurt to give it the look and feel of yogurt that has been fermented for much longer such as would happen with yogurt made on a small dairy farm or in your kitchen.

This is why Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride MD, author of Gut and Psychology Syndrome, recommends avoiding store yogurt and eating yogurt only that you’ve made yourself and fermented for a full 24 hours in order for the majority of the lactose (milk sugar) to be used up and sufficient strength of the probiotic cultures to become established.

The Specific Carbohydrate (SCD) Diet also recommends yogurt fermented for a full 24 hours.

Of course making yogurt yourself also permits selection of high quality milk and avoidance of all the additives and sugar added to most commercial store yogurt as well.

Yogurt made in the traditional fashion and fermented for 24 hours will most definitely assist your gut and help rebalance your digestive flora with the help of beneficial though transient cultures that good quality yogurt is loaded with.

It is also helpful to note that yogurt made with raw milk will be naturally more drinkable style like kefir than yogurt made with heated or pasteurized milk.

So if someone you know eats a lot of commercial yogurt and is doing this primarily to assist with their digestive health and to boost immune function, tip them off that they would be better off making it themselves or buying it from a small farm!

Commercial Yogurt Sweetened with GMO Sugar

Another problem with commercial yogurt is that it is usually sweetened with genetically modified (GMO) sweeteners.  Many consumers know that corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup are GMO.  However, even health savvy shoppers typically don’t realize that even if the label on commercial yogurt says “sugar” instead of corn syrup, it is virtually certain that sugar is also  from a GMO source. Only if the label says “cane sugar” or “organic sugar” does this guarantee that the sugar is GMO free.

The best policy is to make yogurt yourself or buy it from a small farm that uses quality grassfed milk.

If you must buy commercial yogurt for whatever reason, this brand is a quality product that I seek out when traveling.

Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

Picture Credit

 

Comments (158)

  1. Pingback: 32 Unhealthy Foods You Think Are Good For You | Eat Real Stay Sane

  2. Sharon Lee Lockhart via Facebook February 13, 2014 at 8:18 pm

    Now adays most folks don’t want to know how to make their own anything. they are so used to just going to the store and buying what they want/need. We all need to learn a bit more about being self sustaining, and this is just one way we can learn it.

    Reply
  3. Cassandra Vorisek-Creto via Facebook February 11, 2014 at 8:59 am

    Stoneyfield is the only yogurt eaten in my household….not talented enough to make it on my own ;) The other brands are just plain scary!!

    Reply
  4. I buy ours from a local organic farm. It’s made from their raw pastured milk. Unsweetened and it is pourable no thickener added.
    But for those who can’t do this are there any store brands you can recommend? How about trader joes whole milk unsweetened?

    Reply
  5. I’m glad your pity made you feel superior about this “ignorant” woman. In your 1st 3 paragraphs, i mean sentences separated by an entire line, you asserted yourself as younger, happier and smarter. Possibly shes cooking for an organization, has a husband who can digest only liquids or, fuck, just likes the stuff.

    Now it’s my turn. Biotics naturally reside in our digestive track. When taking ANTI-biotics (xxxx-acillin), the Dr will recommend buttermilk or yogurt after to not replace, but to begin cultivating the bacteria that help us digest. That “fermenting” takes place naturally in our intestines.

    I rather would have seen you attack types of yogurt like “carb-master” or other spinoffs.

    Reply
  6. Marinella Vitale Ghion via Facebook February 11, 2014 at 3:56 am

    I enjoy reading your posts, but it drives you to craziness!!! If you constantly have to worry about everything we eat and drink, what’s the use!!

    Reply
  7. I personally look for the word probiotic on the label or i wont buy yogurt. Unles im eating it just for flavor and not to fight an infection. YOu can buy probiotic suplement vitamins also, instead of eating yogurt.

    Nothing in this article is prooven fact. It needs to site its resources. Where did the journalist get their information from? So far all we have is 1 doctors word about this. Some one’s opinion. Nothing more.

    Anyone can make up information and post an article on the web. (not accusing this of being correct or incorrect). People are so eager to believe everything they see in writing.
    (example: the word gullible isn’t in the dictionary.)

    This is also this is a ‘.com’ website which can be filled with made up information, not backed up by sources. I’m more opt to trust a ‘.org’ , ‘.net’ and ‘.gov’ site for information over a ‘.com’ link.

    Reply
  8. Sylvie Cormier-Arsenault via Facebook February 11, 2014 at 12:23 am

    I get organic kefir and plain greek(not reduced fat) yogurt. Check the packaging for the amount of probiotics per serving. If it doesn’t say, leave it, it probably doesn’t have much. And get to know what ingredients to avoid. Or make your own.

    Chad, for Greek yogurt, just strain the whey out of your homemade yogurt. It’ll make it thicker and higher in fat, which is what real Greek is. Or add a bit of “grass fed” gelatine if you want less fat, but milk fat won’t make anyone fat.

    Reply
  9. Chad Highfield via Facebook February 11, 2014 at 12:13 am

    Is there a good site about making Greek youqurt ? I eat alot of youqurt due to some past surgeries on my stomach .Its one of my main protien sources ?

    Reply
  10. Kathleen Jones Ponto – Chobani has said themselves that it would be too expensive to use non-GMO ingredients. “All natural” doesn’t mean diddly – there isn’t much regulation on that term. I personally do use Stoneyfield but they are still lowfat which I hate. We don’t have raw milk readily available in our area or I would make my own!

    Reply
  11. I remember my ex used to eat store bought yogurt trying to be “healthy” and she ended up gaining weight!
    I don’t eat yogurt much myself! I prefer my homemade kefir made from raw grassfed milk! It has many more strands of beneficial microbes and it’s way easier to make! :)

    Reply
  12. Jennifer Myers via Facebook February 10, 2014 at 11:53 pm

    Organic and no sugar is the best if you’re going to eat yogurt. If it’s cultured even better for your health. But with all of the sugar and crap most yogurts contain, it’ll do more harm than good. Lose the sugar, go organic.

    Reply
  13. Ruth Weston via Facebook February 10, 2014 at 11:37 pm

    How can a thermally sealed packet that is stored on a shelf be REAL yogurt! How can shoppers be so ill informed! This rubbish will only sell if there is a market for it, simple don’t buy it! The sad thing is that children will never learn the truth either if adults buy these sugar filled sacks of ‘who knows what’ which is labelled as yogurt….PLEASE teach your children the REAL thing……yogurt is a LIVING food!

    Reply
  14. I just started a (beginner) blog and just shared how I make my own yogurt in a crockpot, then wrapped up in a blanket overnight. I mentioned how I don’t know how most store yogurts are considered yogurts either! I’ve been so excited that many I my friends and new followers are trying some of the things I share, but I don’t want to spread incorrect information if course. I only ferment mine about 12 hours and don’t think my technique would work for 24 hours. How do you recommend making your own yogurt??
    Amanda Evans\’s last post: Easy Homemade Crock Pot Yogurt

    Reply
  15. Leafs Zn Fishes via Facebook February 10, 2014 at 11:26 pm

    I have a question. I buy Nancy’s yogurt. Plain, or Honey Yogurt. can I sit this in a warm place to up the probiotic rate ?

    Reply
  16. Danny N Gretchen Jones via Facebook February 10, 2014 at 11:23 pm

    We make our own with raw grassfed milk. I make a honey syrup with serviceberries (they grow wild on our property, so they’re FREE) that I like to mix with it. We also use it to make soft yogurt cheeses. It’s so easy, I don’t know why anybody wouldn’t make their own, really. I can’t believe I waited so long to start making it!

    Reply
  17. Pingback: 5 Reasons you should make your own yogurt - Paleo Diet Basics

  18. I was working in a dairy plant (process enginner) and the process fermentation time for a plain yoghurt is always 6-7 hours. Its almost imposible to make yoghurt in one hour or less.

    Regards

    Reply
  19. I have tried this and it’s WONDERFUL. Thank you so much for this innovative way to utilize my useless microwave. I have a question. Some of my raw milk accidentally froze (overstuffed fridge) and I’m wondering if I can still use it to make yogurt.

    Reply
  20. Sarah,
    Question about probiotics. I have been trying to find out on your site if you take a probiotic pill along with all the fermented foods/ beverages that you eat. I don’t want to give up my green pastures CLO so I was thinking of giving up my probiotics instead ( a financial thing) I actually want to increase my CLO daily. I eat yogurt, sauerkraut, water kefir (occasionally) are these enough?
    I drink raw milk also. So what your thoughts on probiotic pills? I love your site and can’t wait to see what you write everyday,,,,

    Reply
  21. Pingback: My breastfed baby has bad gas and skin rashes. Is it the dairy and gluten I’m eating? « Food For Kids Health

  22. Hi Sarah- I have tried the 24 hour incubation twice now, and both times the yogurt has curdled. I use my oven light for warmth, and the second time I monitored the temperature with a thermometer which stayed at 103 pretty consistently. If anything, I’d think this was a little cool. Isn’t it supposed to be 110? What am I doing wrong?

    Also, the entire batch of yogurt isn’t setting. I always drain my yogurt to get the whey and the first cup is very milky in appearance. The latter part of the whey is yellow and crystal clear. Any tips? I very much appreciate any advice!
    Lauren\’s last post: Marriage Mondays

    Reply
  23. Pingback: Why I prefer homemade yogurt over store-bought « churnyourown

  24. Ever since I stopped drinking Lactose free milk and started drinking grass-fed, low-temp milk (Natural by Nature, Ronnybrook), my intolerance has all but disappeared. I love Traders Point Creamery and Fage Total yogurt. If I was going to make yogurt in the crockpot then Fage Total would be the best one for me. Sadly, New Jersey stalled a bill allowing raw milk to be sold in the state. I’ll have to make a trip to PA one Saturday for some raw, grass-fed milk!

    Reply
  25. Kristin Konvolinka September 20, 2011 at 7:18 pm

    I’m totally addicted to raw milk yogurt. I’ve been fermenting for 1–12 hours and I thought that was long. Now that I’ve read your post I’m going the full 24! Every time I read your blog I learn something new. Thanks!

    Reply
  26. I can not properly digust the vitaman D in cow’s milk and therefor cows milk and traditional yogurt is not safe for me. any suggestions for me? in my sistuation it is best to not partake of coconut.

    Reply
  27. I suspect the short fermentation time is due to concern about giving other organisms a chance to ‘contaminate’ the yogurt during processing. This is an issue for many mass-produced food products – ie concern about contamination and public health etc. Best to make your own yogurt if you can – which is exactly what I’ll be doing from now on! Thanks for the great information.

    Reply
  28. Crap, I really loved that store-bought Vanilla yogurt, too. I wonder if the good bacteria are damaged by the pasteurization process?

    Reply
  29. Sarah, from someone who met you in line at the grocery store due to your inquiry about the raw milk I was buying, THANK YOU! I have learned so much just from our chance encounter, and it has changed our lives forever for the better. Keep spreading your wealth of knowledge. You never know how it may improve someone’s life!

    Reply
  30. Tanisha Waggoner via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 2:48 pm

    I recently made my first batch of homemade yogurt which came out very good. I used Brown Cow Yogurt. Recently however, my local co-op was able to get whole milk Stonyfield for me and my mom and I have been devouring it. While I agree that regular, store-bought, conventional-brand yogurts are not likely to do you much good, I do feel that the brands that Weston A. Price Foundation recommends are good. The WAPF recommends either whole milk Stonyfield or Brown Cow as good quality store-bought yogurts. Also, as readers above mentioned, Many local brands are probably also very good quality but, it’s good to do your research.

    Reply
  31. Nicole Tait via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 2:00 pm

    It is almost overwhelming how much crap is in the grocery store…So now I need to order yogurt making cultures? Eeek!

    Reply
  32. Linda Hafenbredl via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 1:37 pm

    Amazing how much credence otherwise-intelligent people are willing to give a stranger on tv, being paid to read a script about how great some mass-produced concoction is, without a critical thought on it.

    Reply
  33. Linda Hafenbredl via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 1:37 pm

    Amazing how much credence otherwise-intelligent people are willing to give a stranger on tv, being paid to read a script about how great some mass-produced concoction is, without a critical thought on it.

    Reply
  34. I agree Sarah, home-made yogurt is utterly superior to store-bought yogurt. I can attest to this because when I started having severe health issues earlier this year, our family was under tremendous stress and had stopped eating the home-made yogurt because our raw milk source went away and I didn’t know where we’d get our milk from since what we had relied upon for so long was suddenly not available. The entire time I was consuming the store-bought yogurt – yes, organic, whole milk yogurt from Brown Cow or Stonyfield Farm – my health issues were getting worse and worse. As soon as I started on GAPS in early April, things started to improve immediately. And, things are continuing to get better and better all the time, still on GAPS over 4 months later.

    Reply
  35. Jeannine Engle Buntrock via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 11:11 am

    So true – other problems are that most commercial yogurt is sweetened with HFCS (and way too much sugar when it is sugar) – also that most yogurt is low fat or non fat – these are broken foods, not whole foods.

    Reply
  36. Jeannine Engle Buntrock via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 11:11 am

    So true – other problems are that most commercial yogurt is sweetened with HFCS (and way too much sugar when it is sugar) – also that most yogurt is low fat or non fat – these are broken foods, not whole foods.

    Reply
  37. Heather Bain Brandt via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 11:07 am

    Coconut milk yogurt made at home is okay as dairy free sub, as long as the 24 hour fermentation is included? I hope so because we can’t tolerate dairy right now.

    Reply
  38. Heather Bain Brandt via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 11:07 am

    Coconut milk yogurt made at home is okay as dairy free sub, as long as the 24 hour fermentation is included? I hope so because we can’t tolerate dairy right now.

    Reply
  39. Can you list some recipes for making yogurt? I tried making it with a heating pad as the heat source numerous times, but it was always a failure. Would love to have a good method for raw milk yogurt.

    Reply
  40. Sherri DuPriest Hooks via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 10:56 am

    The way we eat yogurt in this house we couldn’t afford to buy it like that even if it WAS the same as the stuff I make at the house (which it’s not.)

    Reply
  41. Sherri DuPriest Hooks via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 10:56 am

    The way we eat yogurt in this house we couldn’t afford to buy it like that even if it WAS the same as the stuff I make at the house (which it’s not.)

    Reply
  42. Tina Loving via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 10:56 am

    I’ve used store bought sheep’s milk yogurt as one would use Monistat to stop a yeast infection dead in its tracks. So although I believe most store bought yogurt is crap, this product was good.

    Reply
  43. Tina Loving via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 10:56 am

    I’ve used store bought sheep’s milk yogurt as one would use Monistat to stop a yeast infection dead in its tracks. So although I believe most store bought yogurt is crap, this product was good.

    Reply
  44. Hollie Reames via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 10:55 am

    How do you go about making yogurt? We have 2 gallons of raw milk (there was a mix up when my husband and I went on vacation, so we got extra) and I need to do something with it before it goes bad. :)

    Reply
    • Cultures for Health has many different yogurt cultures available to purchase as well as kefir grains and sourdough starters. They have some very good videos on making your own yogurt, including instructions on using non-dairy milks. I believe their website is culturesforhealthdotcom. It would definitely be worth checking out if you have never made any before. (It helped me!)

      Reply
  45. Hollie Reames via Facebook September 19, 2011 at 10:55 am

    How do you go about making yogurt? We have 2 gallons of raw milk (there was a mix up when my husband and I went on vacation, so we got extra) and I need to do something with it before it goes bad. :)

    Reply
  46. I assume that coconut milk based yogurt made with the 24 hour fermentation is healthier than store bought equivalent, too? Due to our current dietary restrictions, we can’t do dairy & my son is missing yogurt.

    Reply
    • We also have dairy allergies here. I too am interested in more info on non-dairy yogurts. Help! I have never made yogurt but I want to begin and I don’t know where to start.

      Reply
      • culturesforhealth.com is one source of info. but I’m still searching on line for recipes to figure out which one might be best to start with. Expensive to experiment.

        Reply
  47. We eat yoghurt more often over summer. I’ve had a couple of attempts at making my own, with varying degrees of success depending on expectations. I would like to let my yoghurt sit longer, but our climate is really warm. In summer, I would be lucky to find anywhere in the house that is less than 25C during the day, and more likely up around 30C. Night temperatures are similar. Any advice on how I should approach my yoghurt making? I have access to unpasteurised goat and cow milk, as well as good-quality pasteurised (non-homogenised) cow milk. I would be keen to try kefir, but also not sure how it goes with the heat. Oh, and summer is long – November to March.

    Andrea

    Reply
  48. I”ve made yogurt using raw goats milk for years. Usually just try to time starting it to milking time, it’s a good temp that way without any additional heating. I use a good quality yogurt like plain Fage, or Fage, Cabot plain whole milk Greek as starter if I need. I have an old fashioned gas stove with a pilot light and leave in for 12-16 plus hours. It’s initially thinner but after refrigerating thickens up. The freshly made makes great base for salad dressings with blue cheese or herbs added. We usually just add a little local honey or fruit to the yogurt. People who are use to sickly sweet commercial yogurt find it tangy but we love it.

    Reply
    • GoatMom,

      Can you elaborate on your process a little for me? I bought two dairy goats a few months ago and I would love to start making my own yogurt. Your post really intrigued me. Thanks!

      Reply
  49. Would you post your yogurt recipe? I’d love to see how you make it. What if you can’t afford to use raw milk for making yogurt?

    Reply
  50. I have always wondered about storebought yogurt. I knew the sugar content in them were not good but I didn’t realize there was hardly an probiotics in them.
    I have also been wondering, how much cultured dairy and fermented foods should we be comsuming daily for optimum health? I know it could vary from person to person but how much do you consume?
    Mona@HealthyHomesteading\’s last post: Raising Homesteaders Blog Hop #3

    Reply
  51. I started my yogurt with Fage and Half n half from Trader Jo’s (organic) it makes a much thicker yogurt with no straining. After once, you use a little of your own starter. I make a quart at a time and use the cloth in the bottom of pan of water heating method, scald, then cool to 100 to 110 add starter with a little of the cooled heated cream, then stir in—-Put in oven with the light on only for several hours—-it’s the best!
    Jean

    Reply
  52. How funny that I just got your email. I literally just watched a commerical for Go-gurts, and was making my usual irritated/sarcastic comments that come after watching pretty much any “food” commericals these days. Gross!

    Reply
  53. I was buying whole milk plain yogurt for a while from one of the big companies, and I called the company one day to ask how long they ferment their yogurt. Not only did the rep I spoke with have no idea what I was talking about, but she had no idea where to find the information.

    I make a batch of homemade yogurt at least once a week.

    Reply
  54. Nourishing Traditions and Mother Linda’s website. It’s very thin though and does anyone know if fermenting it the full 24 hours helps it thicken more than 10-12? I strain mine, then end up with much less yogurt but thicker, and of course I get all that great whey. It is expensive, but very healthy!

    Reply
  55. Pingback: Traditional Diets Have a High Food Enzyme Content | Farm Food Blog

  56. i found a grass fed non-homogenized whole milk yogurt at my local co-op. they do it in small batches, so i’m sure they ferment it longer….i will call to check though, thanks for the tip. There aren’t any thickeners or sweeteners in it so I’m guessing its legit!

    Reply
  57. I have only been drinking farm fresh raw milk from a local farmer for two weeks and it is fantastic. The thing is I am pretty in love with Fage greek yogurt. Is there any way for me to make my own yogurt from the raw milk and cream in a style that is similar to that? How do you get the culture? ANY advice would be so appreciated!

    Reply
    • My family loves Fage as well. I haven’t tried making my own yogurt yet…so I’ll be very interested to hear Sarah’s take on Fage. It agrees with our digestion as well as our raw milk does.

      Reply
    • Use the Fage Yogurt, if it has active bacteria, to culture your milk, then strain it to achieve the greek style. I culture milk straight from our cow (after straining), so it’s still warm, but you can heat it to be WARM, without letting it get hot, then add a few tbsp of the greek yogurt. You can either let it sit in a dark place for a few days to culture (I’ve heard, but not tried), or place your jar of warm milk with culture whisked in into a sports cooler with warm water (not hot!) for 24 hours, then strain. Makes some super yummy yogurt!!

      Reply
  58. White Mountain yogurt is fermented 24 hours. It is the only one I have found.
    I buy their organic whole milk one.

    From their website:
    2. I have Celiac’s or Crohn’s disease. Is your yogurt OK to eat?

    Our yogurt is considered gluten free and incubated over a 24-hour period. We do not add any milk solids, or anything else to our yogurt except milk and culture. Cow’s milk contains 2 mg of free glutamates per 100 grams.

    http://www.whitemountainfoods.com/FAQ.html

    Reply
    • Yes, White Mountain is one of the few national brands that has a LOT of living cultures in it from a long ferment. They also use milk that is hormone and antibiotic free (although not necessarily organic or grassfed).

      There are other brands out there that have good long ferments, but I’ve forgotten what they are since White Mountain is so readily available in all the stores near me.
      Food Renegade\’s last post: Real Food Link Love

      Reply
      • Are you thinking of Mountain High? It is usually readily available and is not organic. White Mountain is a different brand and can be tricky to find; and they do have an organic line. I did some research and White Mountain was the only commercial yogurt available in the San Francisco area that does a 24 hour ferment.

        Reply
        • So funny, and sad.. I just called Mountain High’s info line. I had not originally researched them since I was only interested in organic. The person on the info line told me that they don’t ferment their yogurt. She obviously didn’t even know how yogurt is supposed to be made. A supervisor finally told me the yogurt was cultured from the time they put it in the cup until the pull date. :) After I explained how yogurt is made, they said they would have to get back to me.

          Reply
          • Just checked online. Mountain High is now owned by Dean Foods. yuck. figures. But do try White Mountain organic if you can get it. I buy it when I don’t make my own.

  59. My son is addicted to go-gurts and packs one in his lunch everyday. I know it’s not as good as homemade yogurt (which he loathes and refuses to eat), but I tell myself “it’s better than nothing.” :-/

    Reply
    • You could take some whole fat, plain yogurt like Cabot’s Greek Yogurt, or the Brown Cow’s Cream Top yogurt and put it into single serve tubs with some honey and dried fruit or fresh fruit, or jelly/jam sweetened with fruit juice if you can find that. Or maybe freezing it though I’m not sure if that kills any enzymes or other parts of the benefit of yogurt. Feeding your child a low fat, sugared, food dye ridden snack is definitely not better than nothing. I know your heart is in the right place, you’re surely concerned for your child’s health and love him. Do some extra research on nutrition through the Weston A. Price Foundation or other sites that offer tips on traditional, whole, real foods and nutrition. It’ll change your life, I promise!

      Reply
  60. I love to make my yogurt from my homemade kefir. I don’t need to subject the raw milk to any heat (which destroys all those great enzymes) and it’s loaded with great probiotics. It’s funny, because there are times that I let my kefir ferment for too long and it begins to separate the milk fat from the whey. So I just let it sit out longer to fully separate. I then strain it until the “curd” is a yogurt consistency and then I have the whey leftover to use for homemade beet kvass, sauerkraut or to use when I soak grains or legumes. It’s a win-win situation!

    Oh, and Sarah, I love to talk to people in the grocery line. I’ve told people about lots of good things they should try. Sometimes I’ll even ask someone about a unique item they have in their cart that I haven’t tried yet. I’ve even shared phone numbers with one lady so I could share with her my kefir grains.

    We all hate that sometimes long wait in the grocery line, so why not make it fun?

    Shari

    Reply
    • Your yogurt probably got too hot. Some yogurt makers build up heat and if you go too long they will kill the culture and curdle the milk.

      Reply
  61. Perfect timing with this post! I am almost finised with my first batch of homemade yogurt right now….but I am wondering if it didn’t sit long enough either. 3 hrs cooking milk, 3 hours for it to stand, and then 12 hours with the yogurt culture in it.

    I too, was shocked, when I finally woke up and read the ingredient label on the store bought yogurt – YUK!
    Allison\’s last post: Leaving your Husband Home Alone

    Reply

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