At Last! A Magazine Truly Worth the Read

by Sarah TheHealthyHomeEconomist November 1, 2012

I don’t know about you, but I find it annoying when I go to a health professional’s office only to find stacks of women’s magazines that spout nothing but establishment nonsense regarding nutrition and wellness strewn all over the waiting room.

Popular magazines like Women’s Day, Redbook, and Family Circle, while a somewhat entertaining and mind numbing way to spend a few minutes until the receptionist calls you in for your appointment, are clearly not a good use of time and can, in fact, easily lead you astray with misleading or even false health information and recipes loaded with processed foods.

Those healthfood store rags are even worse as they are really just marketing pieces disguised as “objective” health information for whatever food or supplement company pays for the magazine space.

The advent of internet access via one’s cellphone and the rapidly increasing popularity of tablet computers which easily fit right in your purse have at last put an end to all that paper based poppycock!

Now, instead of thumbing through paper magazines, you can instead whip out your phone or tablet and read some truly helpful health and wellness information as featured in the online magazine Real Food and HealthIn addition to timely and pertinent lifestyle articles, this bimonthly virtual magazine also publishes loads of recipes with only whole, unprocessed ingredients that Moms and Dads interested in optimal health would be proud to serve their families.

The online magazine Real Food and Health is an idea whose time has come as it doesn’t require chopping down any trees to make like print magazines do nor does it cause you any paper cuts as you thumb through the BPA laced print pages.

That’s right. You can actually read a magazine without exposing yourself to chemicals and screwing up your hormones!

What a concept!

The November/December 2012 edition of Real Food and Health features no less than 42 Real Food recipes including the following that immediately caught my eye:

  • Kandied Kombucha
  • Wholesome, Easy Peasy Snack Bars
  • Fresh Spring Rolls with Sesame Lime Dipping Sauce
  • Parmesan Spinach Bread

Other sections of Real Food and Health include thought provoking articles such as The GAPS Diet and Adrenal Problems along with more practical reads like Keeping Kids Happy While You Work in the Kitchen both of which are published in the November/December 2012 edition.  The list of trusted writers includes some of whom you are probably already familiar such as Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Katie Kimball, Ken Weizer ND, and Elizabeth Walling among many others.

If ditching print based Women’s magazines promoting conventional and misleading health information is something that sounds like a great idea to you, the Editor of Real Food and Health, Heather Lionelle, has provided me with a code for the first 50 readers who check out this refreshing online read.  Each of these lucky readers will get a free copy of the November/December 2012 issue which is loaded with recipes and health/wellness tips for all your pleasure reading needs this holiday season.

All you have to do to claim your complimentary copy of Real Food and Health is hop on over to the website by clicking here and enter the code 08QE9

Please note that Real Food and Health magazine is now available via the Barnes and Noble online newsstand so those of you who own a Nook can download the holiday edition right onto your device.

You, of course, can also download the magazine as a PDF or buy through Amazon for reading on any Kindle friendly device such as your tablet or cellphone.

You can follow Real Food and Health on Facebook and Twitter as well to get sneak peaks at upcoming issues and interact with other readers on some of the articles and recipes that are published each edition.

Enjoy!

 

Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

This article is a sponsored post, paid for by Real Food and Health.  This magazine, however, has been personally vetted and I would not promote it unless I found the content to be of a quality that I would read and purchase myself. 

 

Comments (47)

  1. Thanks for the free link. For those having issues, when you get to the site, go to SIGN IN. Use your email address to login. Once you do that a spot will pop up where you enter your promo code.

    Now onto the review… I personally don’t get it. I follow blogs (some of which belong to the contributing writers of this magazine) and they are far more lovely. The layout and design seems more like a high school students project. Yikes. I was hoping this would have more of a “real” magazine feel to it. I take great pride in not following the norm, when it comes to the way I eat, exercise, clean etc etc. But to me this had the feel of an old hippie wanna be style internet magazine- which I get aggravated at cause thats not how I want to be seen. I am truly not trying to be mean but I feel slightly insulted that this is all they can come up with, and want to get paid to view it. The recipes seem fine and healthy but again I can find those with much prettier pictures on many various blogs, many of whom I can find on Sarah’s blog carnival every monday. JUST MY HUMBLE OPINION. =)

    Reply
  2. This new magazine looks promising. Thanks for the info and the opportunity to download it. One thing I liked for sure was that the recipes were not broken up all over the magazine. I hate when they show photos and talk about food and then the recipes are tossed in the back of the mag. Or worse, when they have part of the recipe with a nice photo, then you have to go 100 pages back for the rest. Makes it less desirable to save the recipe when I have to cut it out of more than one place of the mag. Just have it all together! That is such a pet peeve of mine.

    I currently have subscriptions to Good Housekeeping and Family Fun. Both magazines irritate me with their false information. I can’t wait till my subscriptions run out. One was free and the other was only a couple dollars so at least I didn’t waste too much money on them. I did not know about BPA on the pages! I usually leaf through them for any crafts my kids might like (which hasn’t been any in a long time), and then they get tossed in the paper recycle…

    Reply
    • @Jessica- I totally hear what you are saying! In Christmas 2010, a relative gave me a subscription to Prevention magazine because, as she said, “You’re so into health stuff.” Because I hadn’t read it in years, I looked forward to it….initially. After 2 issues, I wanted to scream. I found the info inside to be so outdated and too supportive of the advertisers within. I wavered back and forth each month never wanting to read it but never wanting to throw it away because it was a gift.

      But one month they had an article about the best way to sail through menopause was to limit all fat. Huh? Menopause is when our hormones are most crazy! And fat is full of life giving hormones! Why would I give up fat??? After that issue I gave myself permission to throw it away without even glancing through it anymore; it aggrivated me too much. I too was happy when the prescription ran out, but sure hated all the letters they sent to “get me back”!! Annoying!

      Reply
    • Sarah, TheHealthyHomeEconomist

      I totally agree Jessica. I am totally done with those dumb Women’s magazines that are just a shill for conventional health propaganda and the recipes make me cringe with their “Cool Whip” type of ingredients. Are they serious? And they call that “homemade”?

      I have the current issue and the last issue of Real Food and Health on my tablet to read on my plane flight out to Santa Clara and the Wise Traditions Conference next week. I can’t wait!!

      Reply
  3. Wow! Sarah, thank you so much! Great to see there’s a site for real, quality information out there. Too bad it’s not available in those health care professionals offices!

    Reply
  4. Hello,
    I’ve tried several ways to get the first issue of Real Food and Health using the code above and it’s not working.
    Heather

    Reply
  5. Thanks for the free link! I’ve saved it to my computer and will browse through it today. I have a couple of magazine subscriptions–Saveur, Clean Eating, and Eating Well. I’ve often looked for something dedicated to traditional/real food so this should be a treat. I have a Nook so I will have to check out the future issues to see what it evolves into. :)

    Reply
  6. Same problem as some of the folks above. I can sign in via Google, but when I use the code, I get a message saying the code has already been used. Any ideas?

    Reply
  7. Code didn’t work for me either, nor did the link to them on Facebook. I did go to their Facebook page on my own though. They have the magazine there but only for purchase, no opportunity to use code.

    Reply
  8. Hi folks – the web guy from RFH here.

    The first 50 people have already used the code (thus the error the code has already been used). It went quickly!

    However, you can get a 14 day free trial from Amazon for the Kindle or Barnes and Noble for the NOOK.

    Cheers
    Albert

    Reply
    • Thanks Albert, but what do I do if I do not have a Kindle or a NOOK? How do I get a 14 day free trial? I only have a laptop, and no cell phone coverage where I live.

      CD

      Reply
      • CD,

        We do not offer a trial for the PDF (technically, offering a trial of a single issue would be hard as PDFs are simply files). We do offer the preview (front page, button on the bottom of the picture), and hopefully that would be enough to determine if you are interested in purchasing an issue.

        If you really want, Barnes and Noble does offer a reader for a laptop / computer. It would be something extra to download, and I am personally unfamiliar with their desktop option – but the option is there. It should be noted the B&N and Kindle are both looking at the trial as part of their subscriptions (not a trial for a single issue).

        Cheers
        Albert

        Reply
  9. Pingback: At Last! A Magazine Truly Worth the Read | CookingPlanet

  10. Kiki Becerra Bacaro via Facebook November 1, 2012 at 11:34 am

    apparently, you are WAY too popular since it tells me that the code has already been used…sigh…thanks for giving them away though:)

    Reply
  11. There is also a good print magazine called “Well Being Journal”. i found it at Barnes & Noble. im not sure about the assumption that computers are less toxic than magazines.

    Reply
  12. So you’re saying that connecting into Wifi and using electricity is much healthier than using paper? And that looking at a screen is much healthier than looking at the printed page? I was going to ask for proof but it just seems so ludicrous to even think that you’re right. Seriously Sarah– should we throw out our Nourishing Traditions cookbooks too? I don’t think you have to make things up– just promote good content.

    Reply
  13. Every time I read about someone promoting the use of the internet for things like “magazines” I wonder what in the world we’re all thinking. The people who need to be influenced about eating well and being healthy are generally the portion of the population who don’t even know how to turn a computer on. There’s just as much crap online as there is in printed form, although I can see Sarah’s point about how a colorized printed magazine page would probably have more effect on the reader, but that can happen whether the information is good or bad, and that will all depend on your POV.

    I love my computer but I hate my computer.

    And I, too, prefer printed recipes because my computer isn’t near my kitchen. And I ABHOR video recipes. Grrrrrrr. If there’s a video with a printed transcript below, that’s a better version for me.

    Over and above the regular raggy magazines mentioned (Redbook, etc) the ones I hate are the health and fitness magazines which spout nothing but pure nonsense most of the time. They also make everyone feel as though if they aren’t a size 2 they’re just worthless and horribly fat. It’s craziness. Waiting rooms should have travel magazines and that’s about it, if any at all. Those are usually still full of drug ads, though. THAT’S where they get the older people dragged into “asking their doctor” for this or that medication. Those ads and the garbage on TV about drugs is non-ending.

    Reply
  14. For the people who love print…

    No matter how you get the magazine you can print the recipes! The pdf you simply print out, on the NOOK and Kindle we include a code in the back of the issue to get access to the reading library where you can print out recipes. You don’t have to print them all, just the ones you want to use when you want them.

    As far as an actual printed magazine, we are currently working on a cost effective option. If you go to our website there is a print-on-demand version available, but it’s expensive. I’m still working to find a better option. If anyone knows of any good and cheap print-on-demand services let me know!

    Reply
  15. I agree with Michelle. I too find the magazine to be less than I was looking for, and it does seem kind of old hippie-like. There are many writers on real traditional food sites that seem to write in a manner that has more of a well-researched and sound, real science bent instead of just telling personal stories and anecdotes. The fact that one of the contributors bio’s mentions first that she is a follower of Christ is a real turn off for me – I find it is disrespectful and limiting to those of us with different belief systems. I have to say no thanks this time. Also, I agree with Pam – computers and tablets, etc. etc. may not be less toxic than paper. A print magazine available in grocery stores could reach a lot of people that haven’t found where to look on the web, or simply don’t have time or money to do so.

    Reply
    • She states that *she* is a follower of Christ, not that you can’t read the magazine if *you* aren’t. And she’s one writer out of many.

      I get uncomfortable when health & wellness blogs promote yoga because I am a Christian and adamantly against it. But I don’t feel disrespected because of that. And I wouldn’t throw the baby out with the bathwater because of it! There is much wisdom and content to be gleaned from many of those websites, too! I just ignore the posts that make me uncomfortable. I don’t feel the need to conform in every way to the lives of the writers. I’m secure in who *I* am.

      Reply
  16. I love actual magazines in my hands. No e-mags or e-books. My eyes get so tired of reading everything online. I’d support a real food magazine otherwise

    Reply

Leave a Comment

CommentLuv badge

Login to your account

Can't remember your Password ?

Register for this site!