Trump and Carson Speak Out Against CDC Vax Schedule

by Sarah VaccinationComments: 23

Trump and Carson on vaccines_mini

I watched most of the Republican debate last night as I know many of you did too (in case you’re wondering, I am an Independent).  I was primarily interested to hear what Carly Fiorina had to say, as I have been a fan of hers for a very long time – as far back as the 1990s when I was an IT project manager in the brokerage industry and she was President of Lucent Technologies and then CEO of Hewlett-Packard, the first woman ever to lead a Fortune 20 company.

Carly emerged as the clear winner, in my opinion, which has been confirmed by many of the news pundits and early post-debate polls. That’s exciting, and I hope it translates into a nice bump for Carly, as I feel she is an immensely qualified candidate.

What struck me the most about the debate last night was not the individual performances so much as what was said about the very volatile topic of vaccination where a candid answer has the very real potential of destroying a candidate’s campaign overnight.

About two and a half hours into the debate, the moderator put Trump on the spot about his repeated assertions that vaccines cause autism. I was thrilled to see that in response, Trump held his ground and reasserted that grouping vaccines together (like MMR) is definitely a cause. He said that if vaccines were spread out, a little at a time, “I think you’re going to see a big impact on autism.”

What was even more exciting than a leading Presidential candidate talking turkey about vaccines without fear of a relentless and humiliating tar and feathering by the media was the jaw dropping “rebuttal” from physicians Ben Carson and Rand Paul.

Ben Carson, a retired pediatric neurosurgeon, said that he thought that even though there is proof that autism is not associated with vaccinations, he concluded that “we are probably giving way too many in too short a period of time.” He also hinted at the terrors of big government presumably as it relates to the Hitler-esque policy of forced vaccination. This is particularly shocking as Ben Carson has previously come out in favor of mandatory vaccination.

Rand Paul, also an MD, quickly joined in with Carson saying, “Even if the science doesn’t say bunching them up is a problem, I ought to have the right to spread out my vaccines out a little bit at the very least.”

I couldn’t believe my ears! Two doctors, both Presidential candidates, boldly suggesting that people not only have the right to deviate from the CDC childhood immunization schedule but also that the currently recommended schedule is probably far too aggressive with “way too many in too short a period of time.”

That’s an understatement! With 68 vaccines minimum now recommended by the CDC for children by the age of 11-12 with many dangerously lumped into a single jab (there were 3 total in 1950), it is clear that our children have become pin cushions of profit for the pharmaceutical industry.

Predictably, news pundits (with pharmaceutical industry sponsorship) were quick to start blasting all three men for their “unscientific” statements. One commentator claimed that vaccines most certainly do not cause autism listing out the following medical groups that trumpet the same: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the World Health Organization and the Institute of Medicine.

Tell that to the parents of the 3.5 million people with autism today in the United States – parents who, more frequently than not, helplessly watched their child become engulfed in the shroud of autism within hours or days after a “routine” and “harmless” set of vaccinations. These people don’t care what a bunch of spin doctors claim using science for sale as their “evidence”. They know what they saw with their own eyes. Vaccines were the cause or at the very least, a strong contributing factor that pushed their child onto the spectrum.

I, for one, am incredibly encouraged that this topic is finally getting some candid airtime at the highest levels of the political scene and that candidates are speaking out more and more freely about it.

Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

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