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The Culinary Arts Dictionary defines the French word remouillage as “a weak stock made by resimmering bones that have been used to make stock once already.” Indeed, this is exactly what remouillage is:  a rewetting or remoistening of soup bones that have already served their purpose with a previous batch of bone broth or stock (not to be …

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Let’s face it. Despite the best planning and organization, sometimes the freezer can be (gasp!) completely empty of the most basic traditional cooking items. This includes homemade bone broth, sometimes referred to as stock or bone stock. It happens to me, and I’m sure it has happened to you too! And, true to Murphy’s Law for …

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Making homemade bone broth is a crucial technique a Traditional Cook must master. Ideally, it is made at least once a week. Since quality bones are expensive, is pork broth an option? Most people have never considered it. Quality pastured pork at affordable prices is widely available in many communities. Let’s examine this question below. Health Requires …

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German lentil soup is a regular feature on the menu in our home.  The reason?  All 3 kids like it, along with Mom and Dad! With many of my other soups, only one or two of the children like it but the third does not.  It’s so nice to have a go to soup made …

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French chefs have a term fonds de cuisine, which translates to “the foundation and working capital of the kitchen.” Bone and meat stock provide just that, the foundation of both the kitchen and ultimately one’s physical health. One of the most common questions that those individuals embarking upon the GAPS Diet have is, “Do I use stock vs broth?” …

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Do you find yourself wasting bread crusts or feeding them to the chickens, ducks or other birds in the backyard? This is not a very frugal strategy considering the high price of a quality loaf of bread these days. A quality loaf of properly prepared sourdough or sprouted bread is going to set you back …

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This post on making stock using the concept of cumulative time is a follow-up to the article 5 Reasons Why Your Stock Won’t Gel.   In the comments section of that post, several people expressed concern about leaving a simmering stockpot on the stove for the number of hours required to ensure a quality, gelatinous end …