safflower oil, saffola oilSafflower oil is one of the most widely available and popular vegetable oils on the planet. In India, food manufacturers market it as saffola oil, which is a blend of safflower and rice bran oil. Sometimes edible oil companies blend in soy oil as well.

In North America, safflower is available in both low oleic and high oleic form.

sour creamIt probably comes as no surprise that commercially available brands of sour cream and crème fraîche bear little to no resemblance to their form in healthy, traditional diets. Usually containing numerous additives and thickeners, modern cultured cream is also (ultra)pasteurized, meaning it contains no probiotics or enzymes. This fact alone should convince you to steer clear and try your hand at making homemade sour cream and its milder tasting cousin crème fraîche.

cocoa butterMost people associate cocoa butter with skin moisturizing. Creams, lotions, and other skincare products frequently contain this pale yellow vegetable fat extracted from the cocoa bean. It is also a popular ingredient in homemade soaps.

As it turns out, cocoa butter is also a very healthy traditional fat to eat! And, if you are sensitive to chocolate,

amish rolled butterOne of the topics frequently addressed on this blog are the numerous and ever-changing marketing scams Big Food uses to trick consumers into buying fractionated, overly processed, GMO-ridden, nutrient-poor products. Identifying and “outing” these phony ploys is perhaps the single most frequent source of “thank-you” emails to my inbox from readers who, like me,

how to roast gooseGoose is a wonderful option to run-of-the-mill chicken for a celebratory dinner. The taste and texture is somewhere between turkey and duck. Since our family always eats pastured turkey for Thanksgiving dinner, we like to enjoy a different type of fowl for Christmas just to mix things up. This year, it was time for roast goose once again!

avocado oilWhen it comes to cooking oils, “new” and “modern” are usually synonymous with “avoid”. Canola oil, soy oil, corn oil, and of course margarine readily come to mind. Avocado oil, however, is one refreshing example where this rule does not apply!

While avocados have thousands of years of traditional use and benefits,

lecithinFew nutrients have pervaded both the supplement and industrialized food industries as much as lecithin.

As a supplement, lecithin is touted as helpful for protecting cardiovascular health, reversing liver damage, and improving brain function and memory. It is frequently recommended by holistically minded doctors.

Within the food industry, lecithin seems to be in almost everything from dairy foods to chocolate bars!

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